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I have been too used to Imperative Programming which is the usual way of telling the computer to perform step by step the procedure to get the final result. On the other hand, declarative programming just passes the input and expects the output without stating the procedure how it is done. The one I am confused about is Functional Programming. I know Functional Programming is a programming paradigm that treats computation as the evaluation of mathematical functions and avoids state and mutable data and is not a type of declarative language. However, I cannot still comprehend how it can work.

Let's take an example of executing the Fibonacci numbers.

Imperative Programming:

#include<stdio.h> 
#include<conio.h> 
main() 
{ 
  int n,i,c,a=0,b=1; 
  printf("Enter Fibonacci series of nth term : "); 
  scanf("%d",&n); 
  printf("%d %d ",a,b); 
  for(i=0;i<=(n-3);i++) 
  { 
    c=a+b; 
    a=b; 
    b=c;    
  } 
  printf("%d ",c);
  getch(); 
} 

Declarative Programming:

Give the nth number and it will return the value of the nth number

How does the Functional Program work?

Plus do correct me if my definitions are wrong. Please feel free to comment..

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possible duplicate of What is functional, declarative and imperative programming? –  nawfal Feb 3 '14 at 11:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your example of declarative programming above is not an actual program, so it's not a good example.

The main difference is between imperative and declarative. Functional is a particular kind of declarative.

C, C++, Java, Javascript, BASIC, Python, Ruby, and most other programming languages are imperative. As a rule, if it has explicit loops (for, while, repeat) that change variables with explicit assignment operations at each loop, then it's imperative.

SQL and XSLT are two well-known examples of declarative programming. Markup languages such as HTML and CSS are declarative too, although they are usually not powerful enough to describe arbitrary algorithms.

Here is an example computation (summing the income by gender, from a suitable data source) first written in an imperative language (Javascript) and then in a declarative language (SQL).

Imperative programming

var income_m = 0, income_f = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < income_list.length; i++) {
    if (income_list[i].gender == 'M')
        income_m += income_list[i].income;
    else
        income_f += income_list[i].income;
}

Notice:

  • explicit initialization of variables that will contain the running totals;
  • explicit loop over the data, modifying the control variable (i) and the running totals at each iteration;
  • conditionals (ifs) are only used to choose the code path at each iteration.

Declarative programming

select gender, sum(income)
from income_list
group by gender;

Notice:

  • memory cells to contain running totals are implied by the output you declare you want;
  • any loop the CPU will need to perform (eg. over the income_list table) is implied by the output you declare you want and by the structure of the source data;
  • conditionals (eg. case in SQL) are used in a functional way to specify the output value you want based on the input values, not to choose a code path.

Functional programming

As I mentioned above, SQL's case is a great example of the functional way of programming, which is a restricted subset of Declarative programming in which the desired computation is specified by composing functions.

Functions are things that accept inputs and return outputs (eg. case, sum()…)

Composition means chaining two or more together by specifying how the output of one is fed as the input to the next (typically by writing one inside the other.) Finally the whole composition, which is still itself a big function, is applied to the available inputs to get the desired output.

In this snippet I am declaring the output I want by composing the functions sum() and case. This is called functional programming:

select 
    sum(case when some_flag = 'X' then some_column
        else some_other_column end)
from
    ...

If the composition of two or more functions and their application to the input data are the only constructs available in a given laguage, that language is said to be purely functional. In those languages you will notice the complete absence of loops, variable assignment and other typically imperative statements.

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Think of c filters. Where you read from stdin and write to stdout. The code may be imperative but thr program is used like a a function. Say you have a program 'function, then piping to it:

cat foo  |function |tee bar

Will filter the contents of foo through function then through the filter tee to both write to stdout and create bar . Think also of grep and awk the iterator in both is implied and they are used like functions.

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It is an erroneous oversimplification to claim that imperative programming is distinguished from declarative programming by erroneously assuming a lack of ordering in the latter.

Pure functional programming is not prevented from expressing order and implementation, rather it is less able to express random accidental order at the operational semantics level. Also it has the advantage of "Don't repeat yourself" (DRY), which is a form of declarative style (see below).

However, pure functional programming does not guarantee declarative high-level semantics. For this, you need to apply the correct definition of declarative vs. imperative.

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