Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
public XML()
{
    this.InitializeComponent();

    XmlDocument document_name = new XmlDocument();       
    XmlElement student = document_name.CreateElement("Student");
    XmlElement name = document_name.CreateElement("Chandru");
    student.AppendChild(name);
    document_name.AppendChild(student);
    XmlAttribute id = document_name.CreateAttribute("ID");
    name.SetAttributeNode(id);
    id.Value = "sst5038";
    XmlElement fname = document_name.CreateElement("FName");
    fname.InnerText = "Anjappn";
    name.AppendChild(fname);
    XmlElement mname = document_name.CreateElement("MName");
    mname.InnerText = "Thaiyamuthu";
    name.AppendChild(mname);
    document_name.AppendChild(student);
    document_name.Save(@"D:\student.xml");
}

with above code.I create one xml file as code behind in wpf and i save this file in my local disk D:\student.xml

 document_name.Save(@"D:\student.xml");

But i want to save this xml file (student.xml) in my project file which i am working now.

what should i do for this.

please help me...

share|improve this question
up vote 22 down vote accepted

Is this the property you're looking for?

System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much Markus... – Chandru A Jun 7 '12 at 6:31

System.IO.Directory.GetCurrentDirectory(); will help you. Note that the string returned doesn't end with a backslash.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much Andrey Atapin... – Chandru A Jun 7 '12 at 6:31
1  
This will give you the current working directory, which can be different from the application directory. Prefer AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory as stated in the accepted answer. – Benlitz Jul 9 '15 at 9:17

Use

Directory.GetCurrentDirectory();

It works both in WPF and Winforms because its a function in C# and is not specific to WPF or Winforms.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much Nikhil Agrawal... – Chandru A Jun 7 '12 at 6:31
    
Found this useful – type traitor May 18 '15 at 16:32
1  
Again, this will give you the current working directory, which can be different from the application directory. Prefer AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory as stated in the accepted answer. – Benlitz Jul 9 '15 at 9:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.