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I am learning dynamic programming and have attempted solve Problem 15 of Project Euler using dynamic programming. Although I do know that the problem is solvable using binomial co-efficient, I wanted to see how much have I learned dynamic programming and thus tried. Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int gridsize;
    cin>>gridsize;


    int** grid = new int*[gridsize+1];
    for ( int i = 0; i < gridsize+1; i++) {
        grid[i] = new int[gridsize+1];
    }

    //Initialize the grid distances

    for ( int i = 1; i <= gridsize ; i++) {
        grid[i][0] = 1;
        grid[0][i] = 1;
    }
    grid[0][0] = 0;

    for ( int i = 1; i <= gridsize ; i++) {
        for ( int j = 1; j <= gridsize ; j++) {
            grid[i][j] = grid[i-1][j] + grid[i][j-1];
        }
    }
    cout<<grid[gridsize][gridsize]<<endl;
    delete(grid);   
    return 0;
}

The expected answer is 137846528820, while the answer that I am getting is 407575348.

share|improve this question
    
What is the expected result, and what do you actually get? Could you please edit the question to add that? –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 7 '12 at 6:47
    
Sure, let me make the change as suggested. –  hytriutucx Jun 7 '12 at 6:48
1  
I see a possible issue with 1 based indexing into 2 dimensional array as opposed to a correct 0 based indexing. –  Jay D Jun 7 '12 at 6:56
1  
The most fundamental error (i.e. the one easiest to correct) is of course that it uses memory-owning pointers, and consequently leaks memory. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 7 '12 at 6:58
    
Following Konrad's comment: std::vector<T> is good, have some. –  Matthieu M. Jun 7 '12 at 7:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your logic is fairly correct, the problem is that you are getting a case of integer overflow. Here is a modified version of your code that works perfectly. Simply change the int to an long long unsigned type.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;
typedef unsigned long long ull;
int main()
{
    ull gridsize;
    cin>>gridsize;


    ull** grid = (ull**) malloc((gridsize+1)*sizeof(ull*));
    for ( int i = 0; i < gridsize+1; i++) {
        grid[i] = (ull*) malloc((gridsize +1)*sizeof(ull));
    }

    //Initialize the grid distances

    for ( int i = 1; i <= gridsize ; i++) {
        grid[i][0] = 1;
        grid[0][i] = 1;
    }
    grid[0][0] = 0;

    for ( int i = 1; i <= gridsize ; i++) {
        for ( int j = 1; j <= gridsize ; j++) {
            grid[i][j] = grid[i-1][j] + grid[i][j-1];
        }
    }
    cout<<grid[gridsize][gridsize];
    free(grid);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why'd you change the new to malloc? –  Björn Pollex Jun 7 '12 at 7:01
    
Oh sorry, being a C programmer it was completely out of habit. malloc is just as good. –  uyetch Jun 7 '12 at 7:05
3  
“just as good” … not in C++. Then again, neither is apppropriate here (in C++). –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 7 '12 at 7:06

It seems you overflowed the int datatype. According to calculation:

137 846 528 820 modulo (2^32) = 407 575 348

share|improve this answer

It seems a handy debugging (or original development) tool here is a spreadsheet: you can quickly build one to solve the problem following your algorithm, which will show you the result at each step. This should allow you to easily identify the overflow in the lower right side of the grid (starting with grid[16][18]).

share|improve this answer
    
-1, This isn't helpful or an answer to the question. –  Exelian Jul 5 '12 at 15:13

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