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Is it possible to test the use of a given layout using RSpec with Rails, for example I'd like a matcher that does the following:

response.should use_layout('my_layout_name')

I found a use_layout matcher when Googling but it doesn't work as neither the response or controller seem to have a layout property that matcher was looking for.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I found an example of how to write a use_layout matcher that will do just that. Here's the code in case that link goes away:

# in spec_helper.rb

class UseLayout
   def initialize(expected)
     @expected = 'layouts/' + expected
   end
   def matches?(controller)
     @actual = controller.layout
     #@actual.equal?(@expected)
     @actual == @expected
   end
   def failure_message
     return "use_layout expected #{@expected.inspect}, got # 
{@actual.inspect}", @expected, @actual
   end
   def negeative_failure_message
     return "use_layout expected #{@expected.inspect} not to equal # 
{@actual.inspect}", @expected, @actual
   end
end


def use_layout(expected)
   UseLayout.new(expected)
end

# in controller spec
   response.should use_layout("application")
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That's the same one that I found, and from my tests it didn't seem to work as there is no layout attribute on the response (or the controller) from what I can see. – DEfusion Sep 21 '08 at 13:56
    
Ah it seems there is a layout method, but it takes some arguments. I'll ponder on what the solution probably is. – Otto Sep 21 '08 at 14:15
    
On Rails 2.2.2 now and this works fine – DEfusion Feb 21 '09 at 19:55

David Chelimsky posted a good answer over on the Ruby Forum:

response.should render_template("layouts/some_layout")
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This is the correct answer for Rspec 2. – Raphomet Nov 22 '10 at 2:14
    
doesn't works with rpsec 1 like explain by Raphomet – shingara Nov 22 '11 at 12:25
    
@Kevin Ansfield: but the question is about the layout not the template. – p.matsinopoulos Nov 11 '12 at 6:49
1  
@p.matsinopoulos layouts are just specialised templates, they are still rendered so you can check for that – Kevin Ansfield Jan 8 '13 at 11:48

This works for me with edge Rails and edge RSpec on Rails:

response.layout.should == 'layouts/application'

Shouldn't be hard to turn this into a matcher suitable for you.

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Also works for me. – Otto Jan 31 '09 at 0:14
6  
This doesnt work in newer versions of rspec. Instead use response.should render_template('layouts/the_layout") – jpemberthy Dec 29 '11 at 16:04

There's already a perfectly functional matcher for this:

response.should render_template(:layout => 'fooo')

(Rspec 2.6.4)

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That gave me a false positive, i.e. with "response.should render_template(layout: false)" it passed even though I had a layout. – Anders Kindberg Nov 19 '12 at 11:43
3  
worked for me correctly, needed to use response.should render_template(:layout => 'layouts/fooo') however. No false positive observed. – fifigyuri Feb 27 '13 at 8:31

I had to write the following to make this work:

response.should render_template("layouts/some_folder/some_layout", "template-name")
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Here is an updated version of the matcher. I've updated it to conform to the latest version of RSpec. I've added the relevant read only attributes and remove old return format.

# in spec_helper.rb

class UseLayout
  attr_reader :expected
  attr_reader :actual

  def initialize(expected)
    @expected = 'layouts/' + expected
  end

  def matches?(controller)
    if controller.is_a?(ActionController::Base)
      @actual = 'layouts/' + controller.class.read_inheritable_attribute(:layout)
    else
      @actual = controller.layout
    end
    @actual ||= "layouts/application"
    @actual == @expected
  end

  def description
    "Determines if a controller uses a layout"
  end

  def failure_message
    return "use_layout expected #{@expected.inspect}, got #{@actual.inspect}"
  end

 def negeative_failure_message
   return "use_layout expected #{@expected.inspect} not to equal #{@actual.inspect}"
  end
end

def use_layout(expected)
  UseLayout.new(expected)
end

Additionally the matcher now also works with layouts specified at the controller class level and can be used as follows:

class PostsController < ApplicationController
  layout "posts"
end

And in the controller spec you can simply use:

it { should use_layout("posts") }
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Here's the solution I ended up going with. Its for rpsec 2 and rails 3.
I just added this file in the spec/support directory. The link is: https://gist.github.com/971342

# spec/support/matchers/render_layout.rb

ActionView::Base.class_eval do unless instance_methods.include?('_render_layout_with_tracking') def _render_layout_with_tracking(layout, locals, &block) controller.instance_variable_set(:@_rendered_layout, layout) _render_layout_without_tracking(layout, locals, &block) end alias_method_chain :_render_layout, :tracking end end

# You can use this matcher anywhere that you have access to the controller instance, # like in controller or integration specs. # # == Example Usage # # Expects no layout to be rendered: # controller.should_not render_layout # Expects any layout to be rendered: # controller.should render_layout # Expects app/views/layouts/application.html.erb to be rendered: # controller.should render_layout('application') # Expects app/views/layouts/application.html.erb not to be rendered: # controller.should_not render_layout('application') # Expects app/views/layouts/mobile/application.html.erb to be rendered: # controller.should_not render_layout('mobile/application') RSpec::Matchers.define :render_layout do |*args| expected = args.first match do |c| actual = get_layout(c) if expected.nil? !actual.nil? # actual must be nil for the test to pass. Usage: should_not render_layout elsif actual actual == expected.to_s else false end end

failure_message_for_should do |c| actual = get_layout(c) if actual.nil? && expected.nil? "expected a layout to be rendered but none was" elsif actual.nil? "expected layout #{expected.inspect} but no layout was rendered" else "expected layout #{expected.inspect} but #{actual.inspect} was rendered" end end

failure_message_for_should_not do |c| actual = get_layout(c) if expected.nil? "expected no layout but #{actual.inspect} was rendered" else "expected #{expected.inspect} not to be rendered but it was" end end

def get_layout(controller) if template = controller.instance_variable_get(:@_rendered_layout) template.virtual_path.sub(/layouts\//, '') end end end

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In Rails 3, this solution worked for me (see get_layout method) – KIR Oct 13 '11 at 19:58

response.should render_template("layouts/some_folder/some_layout") response.should render_template("template-name")

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Here's a version of dmcnally's code that allows no arguments to be passed, making "should use_layout" and "should_not use_layout" work (to assert that the controller is using any layout, or no layout, respectively - of which I would expect only the second to be useful as you should be more specific if it is using a layout):

class UseLayout
   def initialize(expected = nil)
     if expected.nil?
       @expected = nil
     else
       @expected = 'layouts/' + expected
     end
   end
   def matches?(controller)
     @actual = controller.layout
     #@actual.equal?(@expected)
     if @expected.nil?
       @actual
     else
       @actual == @expected
     end
   end
   def failure_message
     if @expected.nil?
       return 'use_layout expected a layout to be used, but none was', 'any', @actual
     else
       return "use_layout expected #{@expected.inspect}, got #{@actual.inspect}", @expected, @actual
     end
   end
   def negative_failure_message
     if @expected.nil?
       return "use_layout expected no layout to be used, but #{@actual.inspect} found", 'any', @actual
     else
       return "use_layout expected #{@expected.inspect} not to equal #{@actual.inspect}", @expected, @actual
     end
   end
end


def use_layout(expected = nil)
   UseLayout.new(expected)
end
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controller.active_layout.name works for me.

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For rails 4.2 and rspec 3.3 a custom matcher is unnecessary. This seems to work:

       expect(response).to render_with_layout('my_layout')

it produces appropriate failure messages like:

Expected to render with the "calendar_layout" layout, but rendered with "application", "application"

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