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Assume I've declared a function (or class, doesn't matter) in a header file, which is part of namespace foo:

namespace foo
{
    void bar();
    …
}

For a long time I've been reopening the namespace when I was defining the function in a cpp file:

namespace foo
{
void bar()
{
    doSomething();
    …
}
}

That is because I learned it this way and it was used in a project I was working on. I never really though about it until recently, when I stumbled upon a project which used the using directive instead:

using namespace foo;

void bar()
{
    doSomething();
    …
}

Finally there's an option of using the full name. I find it pretty tedious, especially when classes with a lot of members are involved. In my opinion it doesn't make much sense when all content of the file is a part of one namespace.

void foo::bar()
{
    doSomething();
    …
}

So my question is which one should be preferred and why? Especially regarding the first two options (using directive vs. reopen namespace).

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closed as not constructive by Joachim Pileborg, rubenvb, this.lau_, Luksprog, JNK Jun 7 '12 at 20:44

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3  
I would say it's a matter of personal preference. I myself use a mix of both the first and last of your alternatives. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 7 '12 at 8:59
5  
I agree that it's a matter of personal preference. foo::bar is repetitive but greppable, although that might be irrelevant if people only ever search your source using an IDE. –  Steve Jessop Jun 7 '12 at 9:02
2  
It's like asking whether it's better to use tabs or 4 spaces. Don't sweat the small stuff. :) –  LihO Jun 7 '12 at 9:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I think the cleanest way is re-opening the namespace, and I've got the arguments to support it:

  • with your second option, with the using directive, it isn't clear that you're implementing a method in that namespace. You could as well be implementing a free function that uses something from the namespace.
  • the third option is usually used for implementing class member functions. If you look directly in the cpp file, it isn't clear that you're implementing a function from a namespace unless you know that namespace exists. The first thing that comes to mind is that you're implementing a class member function.
  • the first one is the clearest. You open the namespace and define a function inside it. The function is part of the namespace, and this is the implementation.
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Your second bullet point seems to say, "I don't do X, therefore the first thing that comes to mind is Y". Y doesn't necessarily come first to the minds of people who do X, so once you follow the convention the problem disappears. Also, if you can't tell the difference between namespace names and class names, consider picking better names ;-p. –  Steve Jessop Jun 7 '12 at 9:20
    
@SteveJessop I don't think that's a valid point. X::foo() is the only way you can define a class method (unless inline). Whereas for namespaces you have an alternative. So why use two styles to represent different things, when you can use different styles with clear intent? –  Luchian Grigore Jun 7 '12 at 9:22
1  
there seems to be an underlying axiom here, that it's vitally important to make different things look as different as possible. I think other things can be more important, so I don't accept that axiom (if I did I'd use C, since it doesn't have function overloading). –  Steve Jessop Jun 7 '12 at 9:23
    
@SteveJessop ok, I respect your pov, but don't agree. :) –  Luchian Grigore Jun 7 '12 at 9:24
2  
likewise, I think you should invent whatever style guide you're happy with. I just think you're overestimating the practical likelihood of seeing the qualified name foo::bar and being seriously confused whether foo is a namespace or a class. –  Steve Jessop Jun 7 '12 at 9:26

Even though using namespace is the laziest (and therefore the most tempting) solution, it's often not a good idea. Besides what Luchian says about function declarations being ambiguous (someone new to the project wouldn't know if that is standalone function or one in the namespace), and the fact that you might introduce a name in the namespace later, clashing with one you are using now, I have another reason why I'd suggest using the third method.

Using the third method, you give your code more consistency. If A is inside B, you would always define it with A::B. If A is a class and B a function in the class, you would write type A::B(args). If A is a class and B a static member, you would again write type A::B = value. Now A is a namespace, but it's still the same concept: B is defined inside A, therefore it is more consistent to again use A::B.

(There is an added bonus of search-ability if your editor is e.g. ViM)

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