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I have a unit something like this

type
 TMyClass = Class(TObject)
private
 AnInteger      : Integer;
 MyThreadHandle : DWORD;
 procedure MyPrivateProcedure;
public
 procedure MyPublicProcedure;
end;

procedure TMyClass.MyPrivateProcedure;
 procedure MyThread; stdcall;
 begin
  if AnInteger <> 0 then MyPublicProcedure;
 end;
var
 DummyID: DWORD;
begin
  MyThreadHandle := CreateThread(NIL,0,@MyThread,NIL,0, DummyID);
end;

procedure TMyClass.MyPublicProcedure;
begin
 AnInteger := 0;
end;

My goal is to have a Thread (no TTthread please.) that can "access" the vars/functions/procedures just like it's part of the class. This Example fails because it doesn't have access to the vars nor to the procedure. This is just an example, I am aware that the Integer can't change just like that. To me it's just important to have a thread that is part of the class. I also tried to pass the integer as a pointer (which worked) to the thread but I still can't access a procedure/function of the class. any ideas?

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3  
>no TTthread please< What is a reason? –  MBo Jun 7 '12 at 9:19
    
I am using console applications. And I would like to keep the filesize small. –  Benjamin Weiss Jun 7 '12 at 9:24
1  
You can use TThread and keep filesize small. Take a look at LVCL if you want a light implementation of TThread for console applications. But only up to Delphi 2007. Be aware also that the memory manager expects a global to be set if you use threads within your application: not using TThread is only to be done if you know the RTL internals, knowing that your process won't make any memory allocation. –  Arnaud Bouchez Jun 7 '12 at 9:32
    
Sounds good. But would that be the only solution? –  Benjamin Weiss Jun 7 '12 at 9:35
1  
Don't fight the system. What you are wanting is an implementation of TThread without using TThread itself, which is defeating the point. Any overhead will be created by your code too. –  mj2008 Jun 7 '12 at 9:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A thread has its own stack pointer, so you can't access local variables or parameters (like the hidden Self parameter) in you MyThread local procedure (which BTW is declared wrong). Furthermore you can't use local procedures for threads if they access variables (including Self) from the outer function. And if you want to use the 64bit compiler in the future, you can't use local procedures for any callback.

In your case you just have to fix the declaration of your procedure and move it into the unit scope (make it a "stand alone" procedure. This allows you to use the thread-callback parameter for "Self".

function MyThread(MyObj: TMyClass): DWORD; stdcall;
begin
  if MyObj.AnInteger <> 0 then
    MyObj.MyPublicProcedure;
  Result := 0;
end;

procedure TMyClass.MyPrivateProcedure;
var
  DummyID: DWORD;
begin
  MyThreadHandle := CreateThread(nil, 0, @MyThread, Self, 0, DummyID);
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Execellent! That's what I was looking for! I forgot that Self is already within the own instance (TMyClass.Create). I used almost the same just with TMyClass instead of self. Thank you again! –  Benjamin Weiss Jun 7 '12 at 9:46
1  
You should also be aware of locking your variables when reading/writing from different threads. –  stanleyxu2005 Jun 7 '12 at 12:15
    
This is not the way to implemennt a thread proc. You shall call exitthread and release the thread handle, unless you will loose resources.. –  Arnaud Bouchez Jun 12 '12 at 21:54
    
Don't worry the handle will be closed later if the it's not needed. ExitThread here is not necessary because the thread gets closed anyway. Result := 0 is just as ExitThread(0); –  Benjamin Weiss Jun 13 '12 at 1:33

You can use TThread and keep filesize small. I think you are going into a difficult path: reinvent the wheel is time consuming, I can tell you that! :)

Here is some working code to initialize the thread:

function ThreadProc(Thread: TThread): Integer;
var FreeThread: Boolean;
begin
  if not Thread.FTerminated then
  try
    result := 0; // default ExitCode
    try
      Thread.Execute;
    except
      on Exception do
        result := -1;
    end;
  finally
    FreeThread := Thread.FFreeOnTerminate;
    Thread.FFinished := True;
    if Assigned(Thread.OnTerminate) then
      Thread.OnTerminate(Thread);
    if FreeThread then
      Thread.Free;
    EndThread(result);   
  end;
end;

constructor TThread.Create(CreateSuspended: Boolean);
begin
  IsMultiThread := true; // for FastMM4 locking, e.g.
  inherited Create;
  FSuspended := CreateSuspended;
  FCreateSuspended := CreateSuspended;
  FHandle := BeginThread(nil, 0, @ThreadProc, Pointer(Self), CREATE_SUSPENDED, FThreadID);
  if FHandle = 0 then
    raise Exception.Create(SysErrorMessage(GetLastError));
  SetThreadPriority(FHandle, THREAD_PRIORITY_NORMAL); 
end;

That is, you pass the object as pointer() to the thread creation API, which will be passed as the unique parameter of the ThreadProc.

The ThreadProc should NOT be part of any method, but global to the unit.

Here is another piece of code directly calling the APIs to handle multi-thread compression, with no overhead, and synchronization:

type
  TThreadParams = record
    bIn, bOut: pAESBlock;
    BlockCount: integer;
    Encrypt: boolean;
    ID: DWORD;
    AES: TAES;
  end;

{ we use direct Windows threads, since we don't need any exception handling
  nor memory usage inside the Thread handler
   -> avoid classes.TThread and system.BeginThread() use
   -> application is still "officialy" mono-threaded (i.e. IsMultiThread=false),
     for faster System.pas and FastMM4 (no locking)
   -> code is even shorter then original one using TThread }
function ThreadWrapper(var P: TThreadParams): Integer; stdcall;
begin
  with P do
    AES.DoBlocks(bIn,bOut,bIn,bOut,BlockCount,Encrypt);
  ExitThread(0);
  result := 0; // make the compiler happy, but won't never be called
end;

procedure TAES.DoBlocksThread(var bIn, bOut: PAESBlock; Count: integer; doEncrypt: boolean);
var Thread: array[0..3] of TThreadParams; // faster than dynamic array
    Handle: array[0..3] of THandle; // high(Thread) is not compiled by XE2
    nThread, i, nOne: integer;
    pIn, pOut: PAESBlock;
begin
  if Count=0 then exit;
  if {$ifdef USEPADLOCK} padlock_available or {$endif}
    (SystemInfo.dwNumberOfProcessors<=1) or // (DebugHook<>0) or
    (Count<((512*1024) div AESBlockSize)) then begin // not needed below 512 KB
    DoBlocks(bIn,bOut,bIn,bOut,Count,doEncrypt);
    exit;
  end;
  nThread := SystemInfo.dwNumberOfProcessors;
  if nThread>length(Thread) then // a quad-core is enough ;)
    nThread := length(Thread);
  nOne := Count div nThread;
  pIn := bIn;
  pOut := bOut;
  for i := 0 to nThread-1 do
  with Thread[i] do begin // create threads parameters
    bIn := pIn;
    bOut := pOut;
    BlockCount := nOne;
    Encrypt := doEncrypt;
    AES := self; // local copy of the AES context for every thread
    Handle[i] := CreateThread(nil,0,@ThreadWrapper,@Thread[i],0,ID);
    inc(pIn,nOne);
    inc(pOut,nOne);
    dec(Count,nOne);
  end;
  if Count>0 then
    DoBlocks(pIn,pOut,pIn,pOut,Count,doEncrypt); // remaining blocks
  inc(Count,nOne*nThread);
  assert(integer(pIn)-integer(bIn)=Count*AESBlockSize);
  assert(integer(pOut)-integer(bOut)=Count*AESBlockSize);
  bIn := pIn;
  bOut := pOut;
  WaitForMultipleObjects(nThread,@Handle[0],True,INFINITE); 
  for i := 0 to nThread-1 do
    CloseHandle(Handle[i]);
end;
share|improve this answer
    
I will use TThread in future. I'll keep this example in mind. Thank you very much. –  Benjamin Weiss Jun 7 '12 at 9:47

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