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I want to forbid further assignments on some attributes of a class after it was initialized. For instance; no one can explicitly assign any value to 'ssn' (social security number) property after the Person instance 'p' has been initialized. _setattr_ is also being called while assigning the value inside _init_ method, thus it is not what I want. I'd like to restrict only further assignments. How can I achieve that?

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self, name, ssn):
        self.name = name
        self._ssn = ssn

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        if name == '_ssn':
            raise AttributeError('Denied.')
        else:
            object.__setattr__(self, name, value)

>> p = Person('Ozgur', '1234')
>> AttributeError: Denied.
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Just because assignments in __init__ also calls __setattr__ –  neoascetic Jun 7 '12 at 9:21
    
I think you may have to try with a metaclass –  Diego Navarro Jun 7 '12 at 9:22
4  
FYI, this isn't really how Python's meant to work. Document your API to tell other developers not to change it. –  detly Jun 7 '12 at 9:24
    
@detly: The usual philosophy in Python is to take measures to prevent an accidental breach of contract, but not to bother to prevent an intentional breach of contract. –  Sven Marnach Jun 7 '12 at 9:30
    
@SvenMarnach - true; it's up to the OP to apply the rule to his or her situation. –  detly Jun 7 '12 at 9:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The usual way is to use a "private" attribute starting with an underscore, and a read-only property for public access:

import operator

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self, name, ssn):
        self.name = name
        self._ssn = ssn
    ssn = property(operator.attrgetter("_ssn"))

Note that this does not really hinder anybody to change the attribute _ssn, but the leading _ documents that the attribute is private.

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1  
+1. Python philosophy is that instead of having language-enforced "you can't touch this", you use attributes starting with _ to signal implementation details - which means clients can try to fiddle with it, but they are no longer covered by any guarantees you make about backward/forward compatibility or class invariants. So, they can fiddle, they can break things, but its their own damn fault. –  lvc Jun 7 '12 at 9:30

You can bypass setattr by directly assigning to the instance dictionary in the constructor. Of course, this trick can always be used to spoof any other hoops you employ to make _ssn read-only (after an initial write)

 class Person(object): 
    def __init__(self, name, ssn):    
        self.name = name
        self.__dict__['_ssn'] = ssn 

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        if name == '_ssn':
            raise AttributeError('Denied.')
        else:
            object.__setattr__(self, name, value)
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