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Please excuse my ignorance.. i know a fair bit but am somehow still hazy on basics!?!Could you consider this simple example and tell me the best way to pass logmessages to 'writeLogFile'?

void writeLogFile (ofstream *logStream_ptr) 
{  
    FILE* file;
    errno_t err;

    //will check this and put in an if statement later..
    err = fopen_s(&file, logFileName, "w+" );


    //MAIN PROB:how can I write the data passed to this function into a file??

    fwrite(logStream_ptr, sizeof(char), sizeof(logStream_ptr), file);


    fclose(file);

}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

    logStream <<"someText";

    writeLogFile(&logStream); //this is not correct, but I'm not sure how to fix it

    return 0;
}
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6  
You are mixing stdio functions (fopen/fwrite/etc) and iostreams. Never do that! Also, if logStream_ptr is a pointer to an open file stream, why do you want to open another file? –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 7 '12 at 9:30
    
Show us your actual code. Also try to edit your question so that it's more clear what's being asked. What do you want your writeLogFile function to do? –  LihO Jun 7 '12 at 9:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of an ofstream you need to use a FILE type.

void writeLogFile ( FILE* file_ptr, const char* logBuffer ) 
{  
   fwrite(logBuffer,1, sizeof(LOG_BUF_MAX_SIZE), file);
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    writeLogFile(m_pLogFile, "Output"); 
    return 0;
}

Where elsewhere

m_pLogFile = fopen("MyLogFile.txt", "w+");

Or you can use ofstreams only.

void writeLogFile ( const char* logBuffer ) 
{  
   m_oLogOstream << logBuffer << endl;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    writeLogFile("Output"); 
    return 0;
}

Where elsewhere

m_oLogOstream( "MyLogFile.txt" );

Based on comment below what you seem to want to do is something like:

void writeLogFile ( const char* output) 
{  
    fwrite(output, 1, strlen(output), m_pFilePtr);
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    stringstream ss(stringstream::in);
    ss << "Received " << argc << " command line args\n";
    writeLogFile(m_pLogFile, ss.str().c_str() ); 
    return 0;
}

Note that you really need more error checking than I have here, as you are dealing with c-style strings and raw pointers (both to the chars and the FILE).

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Thanks everyone.. I was trying to create a log that's accessible from my C++ and from the C code that it's wrapping. The real writeToLog function would have extern "C" and could not use C++ streams (I think?) so I think my best option is to follow @Dennis and use a buffer... however, that may be overcomplicated. If you had lots of standard out from C++ and C, what would you pass to a logging function so that it could be saved to file? –  GMR Jun 7 '12 at 9:50
    
Just use a string stream in your C++ wrapper to format the string and then get the char* by using the c_str() method. You can pass that to the writeLogFile function. –  Dennis Jun 7 '12 at 9:53
    
I’m not sure what this is but this isn’t proper C++. There’s no reason to use a FILE pointer instead a stream, and this code does something completely different from what OP’s code supposedly should do. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 7 '12 at 9:57
    
@KonradRudolph - The OP explained that he wants to use writeLogFile from both C-style code and C++ style code. Also my code does the exact same thing as the original code (write a string to a file). I'm not sure what your objection is. As for presenting an option with FILE pointers, this was only because he was attempting to use fwrite, fopen etc... and I was showing how this should be used. –  Dennis Jun 7 '12 at 10:11
    
@Dennis Gaaah, you are right. I didn’t see the first version of your answer, nor OP’s comment on that. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 7 '12 at 10:16

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