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Problem

I would like to use the parameters given to a script as is - with quotes and everything. So far, all solutions I found strip the quotes, or do something subtly different.

Scenario

I have a tool that accepts strings as command line parameters, for instance

./tool --formula="AG EF phi;"

I further have a wrapper script that should call the script. Its invocation should be

wrap.sh ./tool --formula="AG EF phi;"

This script does something like

# preparation phase
# ...

# call tool and remember exit code
$*
result=$?

# evaluation phase
# ...

exit $result

Unfortunately, the tool is then called as

./tool --formula=AG EF phi;

which is not the same as above and would yield a syntax error. The only hacks I found would give me something like

./tool "--formula=AG EF phi;"

which is also wrong.

Details

To be concrete, here is some dummy code to exemplify the problem:

First, the C program "tool.c".

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
        printf("%d: %s\n", i, argv[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

Then, the wrap script "wrap.sh":

#!/bin/bash
echo $*
$*
exit $?

Now here is what I tried:

$ ./tool --formula="Foo bar"
0: ./tool
1: --formula=Foo bar

$ ./wrap.sh ./tool --formula="Foo bar"
./tool --formula=Foo bar
0: ./tool
1: --formula=Foo
2: bar

$ ./wrap.sh ./tool --formula="\"Foo bar\""
./tool --formula="Foo bar"
0: ./tool
1: --formula="Foo
2: bar"

$ ./wrap.sh ./tool --formula="\"Foo bar\""
./tool --formula="Foo bar"
0: ./tool
1: --formula="Foo
2: bar"

$ ./wrap.sh "./tool --formula=\"\\\"Foo bar\\\"\""
./tool --formula="\"Foo bar\""
0: ./tool
1: --formula="\"Foo
2: bar\""

And here is what I want (for whatever necessary change in the wrap script):

$ ./wrap.sh ./tool --formula="Foo bar"
0: ./tool
1: --formula=Foo bar

Proposals

Escape Quotes

When I escape quotes like Shabaz proposed, the variable $* contains correctly quoted strings, for instance:

wrap.sh ./tool --formula="\"AG EF phi;\""

and then in wrap.sh the code:

echo $*

would produce

./tool --formula="AG EF phi;"

However, executing $* produces the exact error as above: The argument of formula is stripped after "AG". Furthermore, it would be nice not to escape quotes.

Could a different shell help?

share|improve this question
    
This is odd. $# also gives 1, which means $* is indeed one token and not broken apart. But somehow when $* expands, it expands into many tokens. –  Shahbaz Jun 7 '12 at 11:48
    
$* doesn't tokenize the way you think. "$@" (with the surrounding quotes) is usually better. –  CodeGnome Jun 7 '12 at 12:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use this script that works to preserve the white-spaces you want:

#!/bin/bash
exec bash -c "$*"
ret=$?
exit $ret

Execute above script using this command line:

./wrap.sh ./tool --formula="\"Foo bar baz\""

OUTPUT:

0: ./tool
1: --formula=Foo bar baz
share|improve this answer
    
Please note that ./wrap.sh ./tool --formula='"Foo bar baz"' also works. –  anubhava Jun 7 '12 at 11:29
    
Brilliant! Thank you! –  Niels Lohmann Jun 7 '12 at 12:49

Please see BashFAQ/050 ("I'm trying to put a command in a variable, but the complex cases always fail!").

In order to preserve whitespace and properly handle argument passing, you should use this to execute the argument to your wrapper script:

"$@"

With this method, you don't need to do any extra quoting when you run the wrapper.

$ cat ./wrap.sh
#!/bin/bash
echo "$@"
"$@"
result=$?
exit $result
$ ./wrap.sh ./tool --formula="Foo bar"
./tool --formula=Foo bar
0: ./tool
1: --formula=Foo bar

Using $@ or $* unquoted or quoting $* flattens the string so that it's seen as a sequence of words losing the grouping that you need.

From man bash:

   *      Expands  to  the positional parameters, starting from one.  When
          the expansion occurs within double quotes, it expands to a  sin‐
          gle word with the value of each parameter separated by the first
          character of the IFS special variable.  That is, "$*" is equiva‐
          lent to "$1c$2c...", where c is the first character of the value
          of the IFS variable.  If IFS is unset, the parameters are  sepa‐
          rated  by  spaces.   If  IFS  is null, the parameters are joined
          without intervening separators.
   @      Expands to the positional parameters, starting from  one.   When
          the  expansion  occurs  within  double  quotes,  each  parameter
          expands to a separate word.  That is, "$@" is equivalent to "$1"
          "$2"  ...   If the double-quoted expansion occurs within a word,
          the expansion of the first parameter is joined with  the  begin‐
          ning  part  of  the original word, and the expansion of the last
          parameter is joined with the last part  of  the  original  word.
          When  there  are no positional parameters, "$@" and $@ expand to
          nothing (i.e., they are removed).
share|improve this answer

You should escape " with a \. However, to keep them in one string, you should again enclose them in ". That is:

./tool --formula="\"AG EF phi;\""

Bash will automatically convert any "text" to text as one word, even if it contains spaces. It threats escaped character like any other non-especial character. Therefore, to actually write the character " you need to use \". The combination of the two points (using " to keep space-separated words as one word and the need to enter " itself) resulted in the line above.

Now you want to make your script execute this line, but you are passing it to the script as a parameter in bash itself. Therefore this analysis and replacement/removal of special characters is done twice. Therefore, you need to pass the parameter to the script in such a way that after this analysis, it will produce the line above. Therefore:

./wrap.sh "./tool --formula=\"\\\"AG EF phi;\\\"\""

Note how every " is now turned into \" and every \ into \\. The whole thing is enclosed in quotes.

P.S. You can test this with echo:

$ echo "a b c"
a b c
$ echo "\"a b c\""
"a b c"
$ echo "echo \"\\\"a b c\\\"\""
echo "\"a b c\""
share|improve this answer
    
This solves parts of the problem: When I echo $* the correct parameters (with quotes) are printed. But when I executed $* the same problem arises. –  Niels Lohmann Jun 7 '12 at 10:13
    
@NielsLohmann, think of it like this. Bash first analyzes the input, removing special characters, and then again you give it to bash, so the analysis and removal of special characters are done again. So you need to escape everything, so that after first analysis, you get the line I mentioned. I will edit my answer. –  Shahbaz Jun 7 '12 at 10:21
    
Thanks for the edit, but it still does not what it should. I edited the question and provided some examples. –  Niels Lohmann Jun 7 '12 at 10:45

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