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I am making a controller which should return a zipped list of files downloaded from another server (placed in same data center)

What I have did for the momment:

/// <summary>
/// Enables processing of the result of an action method by a custom type that inherits from the <see cref="T:System.Web.Mvc.ActionResult"/> class.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="context">The context in which the result is executed. The context information includes the controller, HTTP content, request context, and route data.</param>
public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
{
    context.HttpContext.Response.ContentType = "application/zip";
    context.HttpContext.Response.CacheControl = "private";
    context.HttpContext.Response.Cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.NoCache);
    context.HttpContext.Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", string.Format("attachment; filename=\"{0}\"", this.ResultFileName));

    var buffer = new byte[BufferSize];

    using (var zippedUploadStream = new ZipOutputStream(context.HttpContext.Response.OutputStream))
    {
        zippedUploadStream.SetLevel(0);

        foreach (var url in this.Urls)
        {
            var request = WebRequest.Create(url);
            var response = request.GetResponse();
            var downloadStream = response.GetResponseStream();

            if (downloadStream != null)
            {
                var zipEntry = new ZipEntry(Path.GetFileName(response.ResponseUri.ToString()));
                zippedUploadStream.PutNextEntry(zipEntry);

                int read;
                while ((read = downloadStream.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
                {
                    zippedUploadStream.Write(buffer, 0, read);
                    context.HttpContext.Response.Flush();
                }
            }

            if (!context.HttpContext.Response.IsClientConnected)
            {
                break;
            }
        }

        zippedUploadStream.Finish();
    }

    context.HttpContext.Response.Flush();
    context.HttpContext.Response.End();
}

What is scarying me, is that all operations is synchronous.

How hard will be the perfrormance hit if I will leave this implementation?

Is it possible to access the context.HttpContext.Response object from another thread?

Can this code be optimized using asynchronous calls?

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1 Answer 1

You really don't want to be performing tasks like this from within a Web request thread. These types of long-running, system-resource-intensive tasks are best performed using some kind of queuing or message bus system. I recommend something like NServiceBus to accomplish this task. Instead of synchronously creating several Web requests from within the a single Web request thread, you'd enqueue a message with NServiceBus. Then, NServiceBus would pick up each of those messages (potentially asynchronously, depending on configuration) and process them separately. A bonus for this is you get the reliability and durability benefits of MSMQ, which NServiceBus uses as its message queue.

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