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Apologies for my improper terminology.

I have a piece of code that returns a NULL pointer if an entry doesn't exist:

ObjectType * MyClass::FindObjectType( const char * objectTypeName )
{
    if ( objectTypeMap.find( objectTypeName ) == objectTypeMap.end() )
    {
        Msg( "\n[C++ ERROR] No object type: %s", objectTypeName );
        return NULL;
    }
    else
        return &objectTypeMap[ objectTypeName ];
}

I want to do the same thing but this time returning an object instead of just a pointer. The following code isn't giving me any compiler errors (which surprises me):

ObjectType MyClass::FindObjectType( const char * objectTypeName )
{
    if ( objectTypeMap.find( objectTypeName ) == objectTypeMap.end() )
    {
        Msg( "\n[C++ ERROR] No object type: %s", objectTypeName );
    }
    else
        return objectTypeMap[ objectTypeName ];
}

With the pointer I can check if the entry wasn't found like so:

if ( FindObjectType( objectType ) == NULL )
    //Do something

How do I perform the equivalent check with the object being returned?

share|improve this question
3  
boost::optional<ObjectType> or an exception. –  GManNickG Jun 7 '12 at 10:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

There is no language-level equivalent for objects.

One option is to create a "sentinel" object that is guaranteed to compare unequal to any "real" object, and return that:

class ObjectType {
public:
    static const ObjectType null;

    bool operator==(const ObjectType &rhs) const { /* need an appropriate comparison test */ }

    ...
};

ObjectType ObjectType::null(/* something unique */);


...

ObjectType foo(const char *objectTypeName) {
    if (cond) {
        return objectTypeMap[objectTypeName];
    } else {
        return ObjectType::null;
    }
}


...

if (foo(objectType) == ObjectType::null) {
    std::cout << "Returned the null object\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Could you demonstrate how this is done? –  Phlox Midas Jun 7 '12 at 10:20
    
@PhloxMidas: Is the pseudo-code in my answer sufficient? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 7 '12 at 10:23

The following code is not giving an error because the Standard is very conservative.

Some code structures are extremely convoluted and the compiler cannot know whether the end of the function may be reached or not. Therefore the Standard says that the compiler does not have to prove that the function correctly return a value...

However the Standard does say that should a function ends normally (no exception) without having returned a value, then Undefined Behavior is invoked (ie, anything can happen, likely a crash). Most compilers thus have a warning for such situation, for gcc and Clang you can use -Wreturn.


Now, the principle of nullity or sentinel values is not new, and a null pointer is just one incarnation (among many).

If it does not make sense for your object to be nullable (it rarely does but can be an expedient) then you have 2 alternatives:

  • throw an exception to signal the error
  • return a wrapper class (such as boost::optional<ObjectType>) which may be null

In this condition, since it is expected that Find may not find anything, I would advise the latter in general.

Usage is simple:

boost::optional<ObjectType> MyClass::FindObjectType(char const* objectTypeName )
{
    if ( objectTypeMap.find( objectTypeName ) == objectTypeMap.end() ) {
        // do not print anything, it is up to the caller to decide what to do
        return boost::none;
    }

    return objectTypeMap[ objectTypeName ];
}

And then the caller writes:

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    if (boost::optional<ObjectType> o = MyClass::FindObject(argv[1])) {
        o->foo();

        return 0;
    }

    Msg( "\n[C++ ERROR] No object type: %s", argv[1]);
    return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is boost::none convertible to false? –  Nawaz Jun 7 '12 at 12:14
    
@Nawaz: I don't think so... and I don't understand why you ask actually. –  Matthieu M. Jun 7 '12 at 13:48
    
@Nawaz: boost::optional<T> can be used in boolean expressions, relying on a variant of the safe bool idiom. So you can write if (myOptional) to test the presence of the value (or if (!myOptional) to test its absence). –  Luc Touraille Jun 7 '12 at 14:50
    
@Nawaz: boost::none, on the other hand, is an instance of boost::none_t, and is simply used as a tag to construct an unitialized instance of optional. There is no reason to make none_t convertible to bool, in fact it is probably just an empty struct. EDIT: hum, it is in fact a bit more complicated than a simple empty struct (I'm not sure why, though). –  Luc Touraille Jun 7 '12 at 14:55
2  
@Nawaz: ah sorry, boost::none is of type boost::none_t, boost::optional<T> has several constructors (generally dependent on T) plus a constructor optional(none_t) which just initializes it to the "null" state. –  Matthieu M. Jun 7 '12 at 15:13

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