Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does this not compile, oh, what to do?

import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;
import static org.junit.matchers.JUnitMatchers.hasItems;

ArrayList<Integer> actual = new ArrayList<Integer>();
ArrayList<Integer> expected = new ArrayList<Integer>();
actual.add(1);
expected.add(2);
assertThat(actual, hasItems(expected));

error copied from comment:

cannot find symbol method assertThat(java.util.ArrayList<java.lang.Integer>, org.hamcreset.Matcher<java.lang.Iterable<java.util.ArrayList<java.lang.Integer>>>)
share|improve this question
4  
You should paste the error message. –  freitass Jul 7 '09 at 15:29
1  
cannot find symbol method assertThat(java.util.ArrayList<java.lang.Integer>, org.hamcreset.Matcher<java.lang.Iterable<java.util.ArrayList<java.lang.Integer>>‌​>) –  ripper234 Jul 7 '09 at 16:31

9 Answers 9

Just ran into this post trying to fix it for myself. Gave me just enough information to work it out.

You can give the compiler just enough to persuade it to compile by casting the return value from hasItems to a (raw) Matcher, eg:

ArrayList<Integer> actual = new ArrayList<Integer>();
ArrayList<Integer> expected = new ArrayList<Integer>();
actual.add(1);
expected.add(2);
assertThat(actual, (Matcher) hasItems(expected));

Just in case anybody else is still suffering ...

Edit to add: In spite of the up votes, this answer is wrong, as Arend points out below. The correct answer is to turn the expected into an array of Integers, as hamcrest is expecting:

    ArrayList<Integer> actual = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    ArrayList<Integer> expected = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    actual.add(1);
    expected.add(2);
    assertThat(actual, hasItems(expected.toArray(new Integer[expected.size()])));
share|improve this answer
    
I haven't tested this answer since I long ago have lost this source code (moved companies twice), but I gave you a thumb up for resurrecting this. –  ripper234 Sep 7 '11 at 13:53
1  
Good tip. Seems the only "straightforward" way to use assertThat() with any collection matcher since Hamcrest changed their collection matcher generics to <? extends T> instead of just <T> .. –  Frans Jan 11 '12 at 14:48
13  
This is WRONG. This answer checks if actual contains the List expected, not if actual contains the elements of the List expected. Try it with expected.add(1) instead: This code will never pass. There's a very good reason for the compiler error. Not a good idea to just suppress it with a cast. –  Arend v. Reinersdorff Jun 19 '12 at 8:38
1  
Yeees, which given I went on and got the test passing is confusing, to say the least. The correct answer, is: ArrayList<Integer> actual = new ArrayList<Integer>(); ArrayList<Integer> expected = new ArrayList<Integer>(); actual.add(1); expected.add(2); assertThat(actual, hasItems(expected.toArray(new Integer[expected.size()]))); –  Clive Evans Jun 28 '12 at 14:42
1  
That works, thanks for the correction :-) –  Arend v. Reinersdorff Jun 30 '12 at 19:27

hasItems checks that a collection contains some items, not that 2 collections are equal, just use the normal equality assertions for that. So either assertEquals(a, b) or using assertThat

import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;
import static org.hamcrest.CoreMatchers.is;

ArrayList<Integer> actual = new ArrayList<Integer>();
ArrayList<Integer> expected = new ArrayList<Integer>();
actual.add(1);
expected.add(2);
assertThat(actual, is(expected));

Alternatively, use the contains Matcher, which checks that an Iterable contains items in a specific order

import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;
import static org.hamcrest.Matchers.contains;

ArrayList<Integer> actual = new ArrayList<Integer>();
actual.add(1);
actual.add(2);
assertThat(actual, contains(1, 2)); // passes
assertThat(actual, contains(3, 4)); // fails

If you don't care about the order use containsInAnyOrder instead.

share|improve this answer

You are comparing ArrayList<Integer> with int. The correct comparison is:

...
assertThat(actual, hasItem(2));

-- Edit --

I'm sorry, I've read it wrong. Anyway, the signature of hasItems you want is:

public static <T> org.hamcrest.Matcher<java.lang.Iterable<T>> hasItems(T... elements)

i.e., it accepts a variable number of arguments. I'm not sure if an ArrayList<T> is compatible, just guessing here. Try sending each item from the expected list interspersed by comma.

assertThat(actual, hasItems(2,4,1,5,6));

-- Edit 2 --

Just pasting here my comment, there is an equivalent expression for what you want, without using Hamcrest:

assertTrue(actual.containsAll(expected));
share|improve this answer
    
I'm comparing multiple items. (hasItems, not hasItem) –  ripper234 Jul 7 '09 at 15:32
    
So, hamcrest simply does not support comparing two collections? (I don't have an actual list of items, I'm building the list of numbers from 0 to 999 I must compare collections). –  ripper234 Jul 7 '09 at 18:29
    
I cannot answer that for you, I'm telling this based on the documentation. But there is a simpler way to do what you want... use assertTrue(actual.containsAll(expected)). –  freitass Jul 7 '09 at 19:57
1  
it's simpler, but when this assert fails you get a very cryptic error messages, which is less helpful than the error message that I imagine hasItems outputs. –  ripper234 Oct 13 '10 at 10:06

Try

assertThat(actual, hasItems(expected.toArray(new Integer[0])));

to satisfy the matcher signature. No Eclipse around, so this might not work.

share|improve this answer

You can get this error if you try to replace jUnit's hamcrest with a newer version. For example, using junit-dep together with hamcrest 1.3 requires that use assertThat from hamcrest instead of jUnit.

So the solution is to use

import static org.hamcrest.MatcherAssert.assertThat;

instead of

import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;

share|improve this answer

That error message looks like one produced by the javac compiler. I've found in the past that code written using hamcrest just won't compile under javac. The same code will compile fine under, say, the Eclipse compiler.

I think Hamcrest's generics are exercising corner cases in generics that javac can't deal with.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, interesting. So you're saying the above code is legitimate java code? –  ripper234 Jul 7 '09 at 21:48
2  
No, I'm saying that javac sometimes rejects legitimate java code, and hamcrest is a common cause of it. –  skaffman Jul 7 '09 at 21:54

For these cases when code does compile in Eclipse but javac shows errors please do help hamcrest by providing explicitly type parameter e.g. Matchers.hasItem()

share|improve this answer

I just came across the same problem and the following trick worked for me:

  • use import static org.hamcrest.Matchers.hasItems
  • have the hamcrest library before junit in classpath (build path -> order and export)
share|improve this answer
ArrayList<Integer> expected = new ArrayList<Integer>();
expected.add(1);
expected.add(2);
hasItems(expected);

hasItems(T..t) is being expanded by the compiler to:

hasItems(new ArrayList<Integer>[]{expected});

You are passing a single element array containing an ArrayList. If you change the ArrayList to an Array, then your code will work.

Integer[] expected = new Integer[]{1, 2};
hasItems(expected);

This will be expanded to:

hasItems(1, 2);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.