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I know that we can use javascript to achieve this but disabling the javascript in the web browser, user can easily copy text. Is there any way for this using CSS?

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3  
This has been tried so many times before. If they can see it as text, they can get to it. End of story. The best way I've seen to do this is to convert the text to an image. Otherwise there's no realistic way to do it. You could also search for other questions on this topic. There are plenty of them. –  Joseph Marikle Jun 7 '12 at 10:52
14  
Crossbrowser method: Don't write any text. –  Joonas Jun 7 '12 at 10:52
1  
Every 'answer' that involves CSS or JS is NOT gonna work! I can easily switch off JS and CSS and still get the text. –  markus Jun 7 '12 at 11:08
    
@JosephMarikle That won't stop someone from applying OCR, or even just retyping it out by hand. –  GordonM Jun 7 '12 at 13:59
2  
@MadaraUchiha alert ($('<span>' + (2+2) + '</span>').text ()); –  GordonM Oct 22 '12 at 8:37

7 Answers 7

up vote -1 down vote accepted
-webkit-touch-callout: none;
-webkit-user-select: none;
-khtml-user-select: none;
-moz-user-select: none;
-ms-user-select: none;
user-select: none;
share|improve this answer
    
And if I turn CSS off or use curl I can still get the text anyway. –  GordonM Jun 7 '12 at 14:01
    
@GordonM This still answers the question, the OP asked specifically for a CSS solution, as others have pointed out there is no across-the-board solution. –  NominSim Jun 7 '12 at 14:13
6  
A CSS "solution" isn't possible ... there is no "solution" ... not to mention this type of thing shouldn't be encouraged. It's web-design circa 1995. The web is inherently public, and there's nothing CSS can do about it. –  rdlowrey Jun 7 '12 at 14:20
2  
@CSSGuy You should have protected it with CSS then :) –  GordonM Jun 7 '12 at 16:29
3  
@NominSim What the OP wants the OP can't have. That's the point. –  GordonM Jun 7 '12 at 17:08

If you don't want someone copying your text, don't place it on the web.

The web's source is visible, free to read, and to copy.

Even with all the CSS, JavaScript or imagary tricks you may pull off, nothing will prevent a user from manually reading and copying your text to a different document/location.

The best you can probably hope to do is to annoy people enough to discourage them from copying your text. But like all other things, someone persistent would be able to pull it off.

That's what us humans do.

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6  
+1, as this is the only correct answer... –  ircmaxell Jun 7 '12 at 13:55
1  
No idea why this got downvoted, but it's the correct answer. You don't want to share it you don't make it public. –  PeeHaa Jun 7 '12 at 13:58
    
Thanks for all your responses i got what i wanted, my client actually wanted this sort of CSS based solution only –  Prashanth Palaniswamy Jun 11 '12 at 20:05
    
This is not a correct answer. The content on the web is not open source. –  DA. Oct 21 '12 at 21:35
2  
I'd suggest you to use "visible source" instead of "open source" or "opened". –  ThiefMaster Oct 21 '12 at 21:40

There's no way to stop someone sufficiently determined from copying the text of your website. Even if there was some hypothetical perfect way of blocking copying and pasting or downloading the pages to only be viewed and not saved (which there isn't), someone with enough time and motivation can just type out the text by hand if they really wanted it.

The web is designed to be open. And a good thing that it is too. Extracting the data from a web page authored in 1991 isn't particularly difficult. Try doing the same thing with a Microsoft Word document from the same era without using a Microsoft product.

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Thanks for all your responses i got what i wanted, my client actually wanted this sort of CSS based solution only –  Prashanth Palaniswamy Jun 11 '12 at 20:05

Similar question here with some good answers so I won't cover old ground

Whatever you do, the user is still going to be able to view the source of the page and copy anything from there. The only way to totally prevent it is not to display any text at all (e.g. display an image, or dynamically create an image which isn't great for accessibility)

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The web is open source, free to read, there is no way to warn people to copy content even with java script but you can warn via CSS. trick like below.

Try this...

p
{
    -webkit-touch-callout: none;
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -khtml-user-select: none;
    -moz-user-select: none;
    -ms-user-select: none;
    user-select: none;
}
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2  
Very easily broken. The approach on this question is wrong. –  Second Rikudo Jun 7 '12 at 11:02
    
without java script any thing broken easily you can do via page source code easily but in this we just warn to user that please not copy if any one have little bit Coding knowledge coping content easily. –  CSS Guy Jun 7 '12 at 11:05
1  
Even with JavaScript. Nothing can prevent me from disabling CSS and JavaScript and copy your text, or go inspect the DOM and see what it says. Worst case, I can always manually read and copy by hand. That doesn't require any coding knowledge. –  Second Rikudo Jun 7 '12 at 11:08
1  
@Truth The OP asked for a CSS solution, as you and others have pointed out there is no solution that will prevent, only "annoy", but this answers the OP's specific question about a CSS solution. –  NominSim Jun 7 '12 at 14:15
2  
@NominSim: Read about the XY Problem. The solution the OP asks about is not necessarily the correct one. –  Second Rikudo Jun 7 '12 at 14:17

Unfortunately, it is not possible. The user-select css property only keeps the text from appearing to be selected, but it will still copy to the clipboard. I'm working on a chat application and i'd love to be able to make some meta-info(timestamp) unselectable so the user can copy the the message easily without copying unwanted additional information. So all these idealists saying "don't put it online if you don't want to share it" are completely overlooking that this feature could be used to make the user experience more intuitive and productive.

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-webkit-touch-callout: none;
-webkit-user-select: none;
-khtml-user-select: none;
-moz-user-select: none;
-ms-user-select: none;
user-select: none;

This is a good way to prevent user from selecting text. And this is not a bad answer. For instance, if you work on a website that uses Canvas (HTML5) and allows users to drag'n'drop stuff on this canvas; if the user is going out of canvas defined zone, text will start to get 'selected'. Which is ugly. So for obvious ergonomic reasons, this is a good way to go.

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