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I have been trying to solve a puzzle in Interviewstreet. But I don't have a clue for the problem by now. It'll be great if someone can give me a hint.

The puzzle is: You have N soldiers numbered from 1 to N. Each of your soldiers is either a liar or a truthful person. You have M sets of information about them. The information is of the following form:

Each line contains 3 integers - A, B and C. This means that in the set of soldiers numbered as {A, A+1, A+2, ..., B}, exactly C of them are liars. There are M lines like the above.

Let L be the total number of your liar soldiers. Since you can't find the exact value of L, you want to find the minimum and maximum value of L.

Input:

The first line of the input contains two integers N and M. Each of next M lines contains three integers - A, B and C (1 <= Ai <= Bi <= n) and (0 <= Ci <= Bi-Ai). where Ai, B i and C i refers to the values of A, B and C in the ith line respectively N and M are not more than 101, and it is guaranteed the given informations are satisfiable. You can always find a situation that satisfies the given information .

Output:

Print two integers Lmin and Lmax to the output.

Sample Input

3 2
1 2 1
2 3 1

Sample Output

1 2

Sample Input

20 11
3 8 4
1 9 6
1 13 9
5 11 5
4 19 12
8 13 5
4 8 4
7 9 2
10 13 3
7 16 7
14 19 4

Sample Output

13 14

Explanation

In the first sample testcase the first line is "3 2", meaning that there are 3 soldiers and we have two sets of information. The first information is that in the set of soldiers {1, 2} one is a liar and the second piece of information is that in the set of soldiers {2,3} again there is one liar. Now there are two possibilities for this scenario: Soldiers number 1 and 3 are liars or soldier number 2 is liar. So the minimum number of liars is 1 and maximum number of liars is 2. Hence the answer, 1 2.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can easily formulate this as an Integer Linear Program. Since the constraint matrix is totally unimodular, it can be quickly solved by any ILP solver.

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Thanks man. Your idea is good but it's not effective enough to solve this problem. I tried to use this idea but found out that it failed in 6/10 test cases. The reason is that in those failed test cases, the variables are nearly 100 and lots of them are free variables. In order to obtain the min/max number of liars, I have to enumerate all possible values for free variables. If the free variable is more than 30 which means I have to enumerate 2^30(about 10^9), that will be too slow. Any idea to avoid this dilemma? –  zcb Jun 9 '12 at 2:51
1  
I'm not sure what you implemented. The idea was to give the problem to an off-the-shelf ILP solver such as GLPK or Coin CBC. With only 100 variables, they should be able to solve it in a fraction of a second. If you wanted to implement this yourself, you'd probably use the Simplex algorithm. –  Falk Hüffner Jun 9 '12 at 9:16
    
Hi,Falk. I guess your meaning is formulate this problem by an integer program and relax this integer program to a linear program. The ILP solver is effective for linear program. But the solution is factional number not integer. So, how can I find a optimal integer solution based on the result returned by ILP solver? –  zcb Jun 9 '12 at 11:44
    
Because the constraint matrix is totally unimodular and the right-hand side integral, the relaxed solution will in fact be integral. –  Falk Hüffner Jun 9 '12 at 11:51
    
Wow, I didn't know this before. This means this puzzle is nearly solved! Could you please explain why the relaxed solution is integral or recommend some materials answering this problem? –  zcb Jun 9 '12 at 12:49

Ok, how about re-casting the problem as probability/distribution estimation

This is very similar to "inverse problems" (eg infering probability distribution from known averages) which methods like MAXENT (Maximum Entropy) solve very well (eg http://books.google.gr/books?id=Kk6SyQ0AmjsC&pg=PA35&lpg=PA35&dq=MAXENT+inference&source=bl&ots=W4kVjXRpe7&sig=IzjnOVT0FQJtIXSkeFssNxolLh4&hl=el&sa=X&ei=nxJkU-LUHMmkPciigZAH&ved=0CGcQ6AEwCDgK#v=onepage&q=MAXENT%20inference&f=false)

(plus it is nice to be able to connect seemingly strange fields to the underlyijng physical reality)

Ornithology?? :)

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This is Yet Another Dynamic Programming Problem. No heuristics needed.

At each i from 0 to n, by how far along you are to satisfying all currently open conditions, you need to track the minimum and maximum number of liars. (An open condition is something of the form, "From here to j I need k more liars.")

If you have the solution for i, moving to i+1 goes as follows for each partial solution that you have:

  1. Drop all conditions that you've reached and satisfied.
  2. Add all new conditions for this number. If a new condition conflicts with your existing solution, throw this partial solution away. Here are the rules for conflict between a condition saying that by j you need k liars and by j' you need k' liars with j <= j':
    1. If k < k' there is a conflict. (You can't have more liars by j and then less again by j'.
    2. If j' - j < k' - k there is a conflict. (You can't add k' - k liars in j' - j soldiers.)
    3. Otherwise there is no conflict.
  3. If no condition say that by soldier j you need to add j-i liars, you can add for the current step a partial solution with the current soldier not being a liar. (By "add" here I mean "make sure this state is tracked, and update max/min as needed if it was not tracked".)
  4. If no condition says 0 additional soldiers by a future point, you can add for the current step a partial solution with the current soldier being a liar. (In this solution first alter the state to say that every condition needs one fewer liars - because you added one, then proceed as before.)

Your starting condition is that with i = 0, there is 1 solution with 0 liars and absolutely no conditions.

From the solution for 0 start generating partial solutions for 1, 2, ... , n. And when you reach n you have your answer.

(Note, with a modest modification you can figure out not only what the max and min are, but exactly how many solutions there are.)

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Hey! Thanks for your reply! I guess using DP is the correct way. I'm trying to implement it now. –  zcb Jun 8 '12 at 7:55

You can get 90% of the way there using these principles:

  1. If the number of liars in a set is equal to zero, decompose that set into sets of size 1, each with number of liars equal to zero. So 1 3 0 becomes 1 1 0 and 2 2 0 and 3 3 0.

  2. If the number of liars in a set is equal to the size of the set, decompose that set into sets of size 1, each with number of liars equal to one. So 2 5 4 becomes 2 2 1 and 3 3 1 and 4 4 1 and 5 5 1.

  3. For any two sets A and B that we have, if A is a subset of B, then remove all of A's elements from B, and subtract the number of liars in A from the number of liars in B.

We'll use these principles to solve the longer of your two sample problems. Start by taking the input given, and turning them into sets of indices.

    3 4 5 6 7 8                                         [4]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9                                       [6]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13                           [9]
        5 6 7 8 9 10 11                                 [5]
      4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19         [12]
              8 9 10 11 12 13                           [5]
      4 5 6 7 8                                         [4]
            7 8 9                                       [2]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
            7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [7]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

4 5 6 7 8 is a subset of 3 4 5 6 7 8, so subtract one from the other.

    3                                                   [1]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9                                       [6]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13                           [9]
        5 6 7 8 9 10 11                                 [5]
      4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19         [12]
              8 9 10 11 12 13                           [5]
      4 5 6 7 8                                         [4]
            7 8 9                                       [2]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
            7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [7]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

7 8 9, 10 11 12 13, and 14 15 16 17 18 19 are all subsets of 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19, so subtract them.

    3                                                   [1]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9                                       [6]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13                           [9]
        5 6 7 8 9 10 11                                 [5]
      4 5 6                                             [3]
              8 9 10 11 12 13                           [5]
      4 5 6 7 8                                         [4]
            7 8 9                                       [2]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
            7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [7]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

4 5 6 has three liars, so decompose them into individual sets.

    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9                                       [6]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13                           [9]
        5 6 7 8 9 10 11                                 [5]
              8 9 10 11 12 13                           [5]
      4 5 6 7 8                                         [4]
            7 8 9                                       [2]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
            7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [7]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

subtract 3,4,5 and 6 from all the sets that contain them.

    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
1 2         7 8 9                                       [2]
1 2         7 8 9 10 11 12 13                           [5]
            7 8 9 10 11                                 [3]
              8 9 10 11 12 13                           [5]
            7 8                                         [1]
            7 8 9                                       [2]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
            7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [7]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

subtract 7 8 from 7 8 9

    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
                9                                       [1]
1 2         7 8 9                                       [2]
1 2         7 8 9 10 11 12 13                           [5]
            7 8 9 10 11                                 [3]
              8 9 10 11 12 13                           [5]
            7 8                                         [1]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
            7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [7]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

subtract 9 from all the sets that contains it.

    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
                9                                       [1]
1 2         7 8                                         [1]
1 2         7 8   10 11 12 13                           [4]
            7 8   10 11                                 [2]
              8   10 11 12 13                           [4]
            7 8                                         [1]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
            7 8   10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [6]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

subtract 7 8 from any sets that contain both.

    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
                9                                       [1]
1 2                                                     [0]
1 2               10 11 12 13                           [3]
                  10 11                                 [1]
              8   10 11 12 13                           [4]
            7 8                                         [1]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
                  10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [5]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

1 2 has 0 liars, so decompose them into individual sets.

1                                                       [0]
  2                                                     [0]
    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
                9                                       [1]
1 2               10 11 12 13                           [3]
                  10 11                                 [1]
              8   10 11 12 13                           [4]
            7 8                                         [1]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
                  10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [5]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

subtract 1 and 2 from all other sets that contain them.

1                                                       [0]
  2                                                     [0]
    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
                9                                       [1]
                  10 11                                 [1]
              8   10 11 12 13                           [4]
            7 8                                         [1]
                  10 11 12 13                           [3]
                  10 11 12 13 14 15 16                  [5]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

subtract 10 11 from any sets that contain both.

1                                                       [0]
  2                                                     [0]
    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
                9                                       [1]
                  10 11                                 [1]
              8         12 13                           [3]
            7 8                                         [1]
                        12 13                           [2]
                        12 13 14 15 16                  [4]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

8 12 13 has three liars, so decompose them into individual sets, and subtract them from any other sets that contain them.

1                                                       [0]
  2                                                     [0]
    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
            7                                           [0]
              8                                         [1]
                9                                       [1]
                  10 11                                 [1]
                        12                              [1]
                           13                           [1]
                              14 15 16                  [2]
                              14 15 16 17 18 19         [4]

subtract 14 15 16 from 14 15 16 17 18 19.

1                                                       [0]
  2                                                     [0]
    3                                                   [1]
      4                                                 [1]
        5                                               [1]
          6                                             [1]
            7                                           [0]
              8                                         [1]
                9                                       [1]
                  10 11                                 [1]
                        12                              [1]
                           13                           [1]
                              14 15 16                  [2]
                                       17 18 19         [2]

Our resulting sets are all disjoint from one another. If we union them together, like so:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19         [13]

we can see that the number of liars from 1 to 19 is 13.

This technique doesn't totally solve the problem in all cases. For example, in the shorter of your two sample inputs, this technique does literally nothing. However, for larger problems it does decompose your sets into more modular forms, which I expect would make brute forcing easier/faster. For instance, in the larger sample, we have decomposed the problem space into exactly two possibilities:

1. there are 13 liars among soldiers 1-19, and Soldier 20 is not a liar.
2. there are 13 liars among soldiers 1-19, Soldier 20 is a liar.

We can easily evaluate these two cases to determine that the minimum liar count is 13, and the maximum is 14. This is much faster than trying all 2^20 combinations of liars and nonliars.

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Very nice solution by hand. But where would you be if they dropped half the conditions? A program hitting a test suite should be able to handle that. –  btilly Jun 7 '12 at 17:46

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