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Imagine this piece of html:

​<form>
    <input type="text">
    <input type="submit" id="a">
</form>​​​​​​

and this piece of Javascript

document.getElementById('a').onclick = function (e) {
    alert(e.type);
};​​​​

The alert will always say 'click', even if you press enter in the textfield.

How can I check if the button is really clicked?

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1  
Just curious: What different does it make? –  Subir Kumar Sao Jun 7 '12 at 11:44
    
    
Maybe this will help: [Javascript:Enter key press event][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/905222/… –  blackwolf Jun 7 '12 at 11:49
    
@subirkumarsao I'm creating client-side code for a .Net environment which has a single form element in the entire website, but I need to do something when that precise button is clicked –  Hierow Jun 7 '12 at 11:54
    
@ChrisGessler I think it's the same problem, thank you –  Hierow Jun 7 '12 at 11:54

1 Answer 1

Imagine this piece of html:

<form>
    <input type="text">
    <input type="button" id="a">
</form>

and this piece of Javascript

document.getElementById('a').onclick = function (e) {
    this.form.submit();
};​​​​

No confusion will be possible.

There is almost no reason to use input type="submit" in modern web applications.

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This isn't semantically correct, buttons are not to be used for submitting forms –  Hierow Jun 7 '12 at 11:52
    
Most things in HTML, CSS, javascript, won't make sense nor allow the building of complex web applications if you see them only as semantic elements. Be practical and keep it simple. Don't forget that in the age of ajax, forms are rarely passive objects just sent to a server. What would be REALLY wrong would be to check in the onClick if the key is an enter... –  dystroy Jun 7 '12 at 11:53
    
@dystroy Unobtrusive Javascript Everybody with disabled Javascript won't be able to use the form/site. –  Andreas Jun 7 '12 at 11:56
    
I don't see them only as semantic elements, but their semantics are a part of what they are. If you completely ignore the semantics you can just as well go back to table-layouts. In my opinion you should use the right elements for the job unless there are no other options. –  Hierow Jun 7 '12 at 11:56

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