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My problem can be easily created by the scenario below:

 //create a gregorian calendar object that set the date and time as 4th June 2012 at 10:30PM
 Calendar calendar = new GregorianCalendar(2012, 6, 4, 22, 30);

 //when I print out these:
 System.out.println(calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK));
 System.out.println(calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE));
 System.out.println(calendar.get(Calendar.HOUR));
 System.out.println(calendar.get(Calendar.DATE));
 System.out.println(calendar.get(Calendar.MONTH));
 System.out.println(calendar.get(Calendar.YEAR));

 //output reads as:
 4
 30
 10
 4
 6
 2012

 //so does calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) == calendar.get(Calendar.DATE) ???

Just so that everyone is clear the 4th of June 2012 is a Monday, so shouldn't calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) return 0 as part of the first day of the week?

Thank for your all your help and concerns, please also verify the source that you are referring to.

user1442080

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2 Answers

The month in java Calendar classes is 0-based. So June is month number 5.

You actually created an object representing July 4th, which happens to be a Wednesday, i.e. the fourht day of that week.

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THANK YOU! I also noticed the date starts from 0 as well. So I actually created an object that represented July 5th. –  user1442080 Jun 7 '12 at 13:47
    
My pleasure. You could also take a look at a more intuitive time library: joda-time.sourceforge.net. (Oh and would you be so kind as to accept my answer ;-)) –  Kees de Kooter Jun 7 '12 at 18:34
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One should always look for values returned by Calendar.{field} e.g. like Calendar.SUNDAY, Calendar.MONDAY, Calendar.JANUARY, Calendar.MARCH etc. and so on. This is because, the values returned by Calendar.{field} depends upon the TimeZone specified while creating Calendar instance. You can try this by creating two calendar instances with different timezones:

Calendar.getInstance("BST")

and

Calendar.getInstance() // default timezone

and now try getting calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) which will return different integer values for these two instances.

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How would calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) return different integer values? The day of the week values are constants, you still have to compare the return value of DAY_OF_WEEK to Calendar.FRIDAY (for example). The value of the first day of the week might change based upon timezone, but the values returned by DAY_OF_WEEK will always need to line up with the java calendar constants. –  John Bowers yesterday
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