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ok lets say we have a website that need a realtime time;

example :

<div id="updatetime">21:12:52</div>

each seconds update hours:m:second.

what i have in minds using the interval function to do long pool and add the sec +1 if to 60 then add + 1 to m and same as hours. but is there a function already solving this problem?

how do you make this 21:12:52 a moving real clock with javascript that updates each seconds?

i have search google, stackoverflow, many of them tells us how to make the current real time datetime from javascript. but none from an existing time. if there is please do insert the link.

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1  
What do you mean a existing time? –  epascarello Jun 7 '12 at 11:51
    
21:12:52(existing time) to 21:12:53 each seconds add the time to the div –  Adam Ramadhan Jun 7 '12 at 11:54
    
Take a look to this TimeSpan class: codeproject.com/Articles/62852/… –  Adriano Repetti Jun 7 '12 at 11:57
    
existing time means whatever is set on the user's computer? –  epascarello Jun 7 '12 at 12:01
    
existing time means whatever is set on the div, sorry for the ambiguty, i want the div to be a live clock –  Adam Ramadhan Jun 7 '12 at 12:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It can be as easy as this:

setInterval(function(){
    document.getElementById("updatetime").innerHTML = (new Date()).toLocaleTimeString();
}, 1000);

Or use the other Date methods to fine-tune your output.

share|improve this answer
    
new date(existing time) maybe? –  Adam Ramadhan Jun 7 '12 at 12:22
    
With no arguments, the Date constructor returns the current date/time. toLocaleTimeString() gives something like "09:00:43" or "09:00:43 AM". –  Steve Jun 7 '12 at 13:03
    
Be aware that toLocaleString behaves differently depends by OS and User's settings, so if it's mandatory display the time in the format 'hh:mm:ss', it can't be used because there is no guarantee. –  ZER0 Nov 12 '12 at 16:33

If your after a realtime clock that ticks along, take a look at the code I used when I created a "flip clock". I split each digit into a seperate individual digit to use for graphic placement within the clock, but if you strip it down you will have just text that updates.

Javascript Flip Clock

share|improve this answer

If you don't need a very high fidelity, you can use this way:

​var container  = document.getElementById("updatetime").firstChild;
var values = container.nodeValue.split(":");

// Because there is only a datetime specified, I assume is the current date
var now = new Date();
var time = new Date(now.getFullYear(), now.getMonth(), now.getDate(),
                    values[0], values[1], values​[2]).getTime();

setInterval(function() {
    time += 1000;
    var date = new Date(time);
    var values = [date.getHours(), date.getMinutes(), date.getSeconds()];

    for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        if (values[i] < 10)
            values[i] = "0" + values[i];

    container.nodeValue = values.join(":");
}, 1000);

If you want to be more in sync with the current computer clock, then I suggest to you to use setTimeout and adjust the delay argument with the proper elapsed time.

Update: due the comments, it seems the elements to update are not only one and multiple, and the code is using jQuery. Here an approach that works for multiple elements using class to identify them:

var containers  = $(".updatetime");
var times = [];
var now = new Date();

containers.each(function(index, node) {
    var values = $(node).text().split(":");

    times[index] = new Date(
        now.getFullYear(), now.getMonth(), now.getDate(),
        values[0], values[1], values[2]).getTime();
});

setInterval(function() {
    containers.each(function(index, node) {
        times[index] += 1000;

        var date = new Date(times[index]);
        var values = [date.getHours(), date.getMinutes(), date.getSeconds()];

        for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++)
            if (values[i] < 10)
                values[i] = "0" + values[i];

        $(node).text(values.join(":"));
    });

}, 1000);
share|improve this answer
    
works great!, the only problem that it doesnt update all the ids. updatetime. –  Adam Ramadhan Jun 7 '12 at 12:35
    
the id has to be unique, that's why is called "id": to identify one specific element. There is an attribute called name, where the same value can be associate to multiple elements, but it doesn't apply to div. My suggestion is using the class attribute, so you will have <div class='updatetime'>. Then you can use querySelectorAll where supported, or using library like Sizzle or jQuery where is not, and handle an array of "container" objects instead of only one. –  ZER0 Jun 7 '12 at 12:43
    
im using jquery, heres what ive done pastebin.com/NCehgm7P somehow it work with all the class, but they are all the same value. –  Adam Ramadhan Jun 7 '12 at 12:49
1  
That's because you have to take in account multiple containers, therefore multiples different values, and time. You can still have one setInterval, but you have to add a loop to handle all containers. In my code above, it means at least that container and time variables have to be arrays (you can still use one values in a loop to convert the string in datetime). –  ZER0 Jun 7 '12 at 13:07

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