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Let's say I have an anchor tag such as

<a href="#" ng-click="do()">Click</a>

How can I prevent the browser from navigating to # in AngularJS ?

share|improve this question
    
see my post here, I use my custom directive to accomplish this : stackoverflow.com/a/12931625/163216 –  noomz Oct 17 '12 at 9:54
8  
Like Chris says below, just leave out the href. –  Jesse Apr 18 '13 at 14:54
4  
That's not what Chris says, Jesse, use href='' to keep the mouse pointer behavior. –  oma Oct 12 '13 at 15:44

17 Answers 17

up vote 74 down vote accepted

UPDATE: I've since changed my mind on this solution. After more development and time spent working on this, I believe a better solution to this problem is to do the following:

<a ng-click="myFunction()">Click Here</a>

And then update your css to have an extra rule:

a{
    cursor: pointer;
}

Its much more simple and provides the exact same functionality and is much more efficient. Hope that might be helpful to anyone else looking up this solution in the future.


The following is my previous solution, which I am leaving here just for legacy purposes:

If you are having this problem a lot, a simple directive that would fix this issue is the following:

app.directive('a', function() {
    return {
        restrict: 'E',
        link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {
            if(attrs.ngClick || attrs.href === '' || attrs.href === '#'){
                elem.on('click', function(e){
                    e.preventDefault();
                });
            }
        }
   };
});

It checks all anchor tags (<a></a>) to see if their href attribute is either an empty string ("") or a hash ('#') or there is an ng-click assignment. If it finds any of these conditions, it catches the event and prevents the default behavior.

The only down side is that it runs this directive for all anchor tags. So if you have a lot of anchor tags on the page and you only want to prevent the default behavior for a small number of them, then this directive isn't very efficient. However, I almost always want to preventDefault, so I use this directive all over in my AngularJS apps.

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Thanks for the idea. Had to modify it to get it working in IE8. See my answer below. –  Lukus Sep 19 '13 at 22:19
2  
Thanks @matejkramny, very constructive criticism. Any suggestions to make it less "messy"? –  tennisgent Oct 16 '13 at 13:31
    
@tennisgent. I was looking at the code, your answer is fine. I believe its called called arrow computing. code works though, just isn't straight forward –  matejkramny Oct 16 '13 at 14:56
    
It's a nice answer, but this will block my ngClick handler so nothing happens. Maybe the handling of newer versions of Angular has changed this. –  mariachimike Oct 28 '13 at 12:26
    
calling e.preventDefault() will only block the default behavior of the click event (which is exactly what the OP was trying to do). Any ng-click functions will still be called when the click event is fired. –  tennisgent Oct 28 '13 at 13:47

According to the docs for ngHref you should be able to leave off the href or do href="".

<input ng-model="value" /><br />
<a id="link-1" href ng-click="value = 1">link 1</a> (link, don't reload)<br />
<a id="link-2" href="" ng-click="value = 2">link 2</a> (link, don't reload)<br />
<a id="link-4" href="" name="xx" ng-click="value = 4">anchor</a> (link, don't reload)<br />
<a id="link-5" name="xxx" ng-click="value = 5">anchor</a> (no link)<br />
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3  
It's the only actual good answer. Anything that requires touching the DOM or native events is questionable –  vincent Apr 5 '13 at 20:21
2  
This is the correct answer. If you drop href from the <a> attribute AngularJS will call prevent default: –  pkozlowski.opensource Apr 21 '13 at 10:41
    
If you're using html5 mode you might want to make sure you're using either version 1.1.5 when they've updated the $location or make sure to omit the href tag completely. github.com/angular/angular.js/issues/1225 –  Chris May 30 '13 at 14:20
16  
The only downside of leaving off the href attribute is that you lose the normal 'pointer' cursor when hovering over a link. You can fix this by adding a rule to your stylesheet: a:hover { cursor:pointer; } –  karlgold Jun 9 '13 at 14:57
12  
Keep in mind that this also makes the tag un-tabbable, which is not very accessibility friendly. –  Richard Szalay Nov 13 '13 at 5:33

You can pass the $event object to your method, and call $event.preventDefault() on it, so that the default processing will not occur:

<a href="#" ng-click="do($event)">Click</a>

// then in your controller.do($event) method
$event.preventDefault()
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Is it supposed to work with non # urls ? –  svassr Jul 30 '12 at 23:48
4  
yes, and you can also call $event.stopPropagation() so that the event doesn't bubble up (basically, you have access to the Event object as defined by the W3C : w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-2-Events/events.html#Events-Event ) –  PuerkitoBio Jul 31 '12 at 1:12
1  
Please note that at the time this was written, leaving the href empty (or absent) did not work on IE8/9 and Opera. This was a year ago, and I haven't had the chance to try it again (I opened an issue back then on Github, but I think they reset the issues some time ago). If this is fixed (or you don't care for these browsers), then by all means, use Chris' answer! If someone can try it out and comment/edit answer, even better. –  PuerkitoBio Jun 6 '13 at 14:19
1  
@PuerkitoBio - I can confirm that IE8 and below still requires $event.preventDefault()... IE tax. –  Scotty.NET Jul 18 '13 at 15:47
1  
passing the $event to the controller means referencing the DOM in your controller, which means you've coupled your view and your controller. You can call $event methods directly in your evaluated expression: ng-click="do(); $event.preventDefault() for example... although, it's not necessary because @Chris's answer below is the correct one. This might help people in situations where they have nested ngClicks and they want to call $event.stopPropagation(), however. –  Ben Lesh Oct 8 '13 at 21:13

I prefer to use directives for this kind of thing. Here's an example

<a href="#" ng-click="do()" eat-click>Click Me</a>

And the directive code for eat-click:

module.directive('eatClick', function() {
    return function(scope, element, attrs) {
        $(element).click(function(event) {
            event.preventDefault();
        });
    }
})

Now you can add the eat-click attribute to any element and it will get preventDefault()'ed automagically.

Benefits:

  1. You don't have to pass the ugly $event object into your do() function.
  2. Your controller is more unit testable because it doesn't need to stub out the $event .object
share|improve this answer
3  
Could this be done without using jQuery? –  Kato Jun 17 '13 at 21:33
1  
@Kato Angular comes with its own subset of jQuery, to make our lives easy. –  Neil Jul 9 '13 at 11:04
3  
Additional benefit - this also works in IE8 and below, if that matters to you. –  Scotty.NET Jul 19 '13 at 10:46
5  
I tried angular.element(element).bind('click', function(event){...});. It worked. Ref: jQLite –  Bilal Mirza Jul 24 '13 at 9:52
2  
Introducing a directive for something simple like that seems a bit bloated if you ask me... Check Chris his answer below –  Wilt Aug 19 '13 at 8:42

Although Renaud gave a great solution

<a href="#" ng-click="do(); $event.preventDefault()">Click</a> 

I personally found you also need $event.stopPropagation() in some cases to avoid some of the side effects

<a href="#" ng-click="do(); $event.preventDefault(); $event.stopPropagation();">
    Click</a>

will be my solution

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thx it helped!!! –  Trki Aug 1 at 17:22

ng-click="$event.preventDefault()"

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5  
This is the best solution. Of course, you could pass the $event object to your scope function as well. Like ng-click="myFunction($event, otherParams) and then $event.preventDefault() in myFunction. Rolling your own directive for this is overkill –  Charlie Martin Feb 13 at 19:07
1  
This is incredibly simple and works perfectly. –  TerryTate Sep 5 at 17:44

The easiest solution I have found is this one :

<a href="#" ng-click="do(); $event.preventDefault()">Click</a>

share|improve this answer
    
This is not only the easiest, but it also does not couple events with the controller like suggested in other solutions. Coupling events to a controller is something you should avoid at all costs since it makes testing a lot harder. –  jornare Feb 28 at 12:18
    
This answer also has the good mouse cursor when used. –  Wim Deblauwe Apr 14 at 7:57

You can do as follows

1.Remove href attribute from anchor(a) tag

2.Set pointer cursor in css to ng click elements

 [ng-click],
 [data-ng-click],
 [x-ng-click] {
     cursor: pointer;
 }
share|improve this answer

So reading through these answers, @Chris still has the most "correct" answer, I suppose, but it has one problem, it doesn't show the "pointer"....

So here are two ways to solve this problem without needing to add a cursor:pointer style:

  1. Use javascript:void(0) instead of #:

    <a href="javascript:void(0)" ng-click="doSomething()">Do Something</a>
    
  2. Use $event.preventDefault() in the ng-click directive (so you don't junk up your controller with DOM-related references):

    <a href="#dontGoHere" ng-click="doSomething(); $event.preventDefault()">Do Something</a>
    

Personally I prefer the former over the latter. javascript:void(0) has other benefits that are discussed here. There is also discussion of "unobtrusive JavaScript" in that link which is frighteningly recent, and doesn't necessarily directly apply to an angular application.

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1  
Why is this downvoted? I also noticed that the pointer is not showing with the answer from Chris. –  Wim Deblauwe Apr 14 at 7:57
    
Meh, I'm not worried about it @WimDeblauwe. –  Ben Lesh Apr 14 at 17:10
1  
javascript:void(0) is much better than # which can act on the route if you mis-configure it. +1 –  Shay Elkayam Apr 27 at 13:32

Since you are making a web app why do you need links?

Swap your anchors to buttons!

<button ng-click="do()"></button>
share|improve this answer
1  
Since wen can't webapps have anchors? –  Robin van Baalen Aug 14 at 12:48
    
I was referring to the point that most web-app don't need relative links like websites do, they also often just use anchor links as javascript triggers and don't link to a page; therefore a button with the default style reset is just as semantically correct if not more so. –  sidonaldson Aug 14 at 12:50

I would go with:

<a ng-click="do()">Click</a>
  • because according to the docs you should be able to leave of the href and then Angular will handle the prevent default for you!

Whole this prevent default thing has been confusing to me, so I have created a JSFiddle there illustrate when and where Angular is preventing default.

The JSFiddle is using Angular's a directive - so it should be EXACTLY the same. You can see the source code here: a tag source code

I hope this will help clarification for some.

I would have liked to post the doc to ngHref but I can't because of my reputation.

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if still relevant:

<a ng-click="unselect($event)" />

...

scope.unselect = function( event ) {
 event.preventDefault();
 event.stopPropagation();
}

...
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Or if you need inline then you can do this:

<a href="#" ng-click="show = !show; $event.preventDefault()">Click to show</a>
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I need a presence of href attribute's value for degradation (when js is switched off), so I can't use empty href attribute (or "#"), but the code above did not work for me, because i need an event (e) variable. I created my own directive:

angular.module('MyApp').directive('clickPrevent', function() {
  return function(scope, element, attrs) {
    return element.on('click', function(e) {
      return e.preventDefault();
    });
  };
});

In HTML:

<a data-click-prevent="true" href="/users/sign_up" ng-click="openSignUpModal()">Sign up</a>
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Borrowing from tennisgent's answer. I like that you don't have to create a custom directive to add on all the links. However, I couldnt get his to work in IE8. Here's what finally worked for me (using angular 1.0.6).

Notice that 'bind' allows you to use jqLite provided by angular so no need to wrap with full jQuery. Also required the stopPropogation method.

.directive('a', [
    function() {
        return {
            restrict: 'E',
            link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {

                elem.bind('click', function(e){
                    if (attrs.ngClick || attrs.href === '' || attrs.href == '#'){
                        e.preventDefault();
                        e.stopPropagation();
                    }
                })
            }
        };
    }
])
share|improve this answer
    
This kills to much. For example, when I use Twitter Bootstrap's dropdown, I want the propagation but not the default behaviour. This snippet is NOT recommended. –  Robin van Baalen Aug 14 at 12:47

The safest way to avoid events on an href would be to define it as <a href="javascript:void(0)" ....>

share|improve this answer
    
or simply <a href="javascript:" ....> has been working great for me –  Krut Oct 10 '13 at 14:18

An alternative might be:

<span ng-click="do()">Click</span>
share|improve this answer
    
It's horrible practice to abuse a span for clicking purposes. Just go for @tennisgent's answer -- anchors without href defined. –  Robin van Baalen Aug 14 at 12:52

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