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We developing a system where the client application is a .NET client communicating with a server using web services. We need to be able to deploy the client with different configuration options, e.g. IP address etc. So far we have managed this by basically commenting/un-commenting different configurations in app.config, like:

<!--<client>
    <endpoint address="https://localhost/services/service1"
        binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="ServiceSoapBinding"
        contract="ServiceReference.Service1" name="ServiceImplPort" />
    <endpoint address="https://localhost/services/service2"
        binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="ServiceSoapBinding"
        contract="ServiceReference.Service2" name="ServiceImplPort" />
    ...
    ..
</client>-->
<client>
    <endpoint address="https://prod.example.com/services/service1"
        binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="ServiceSoapBinding"
        contract="ServiceReference.Service1" name="ServiceImplPort" />
    <endpoint address="https://prod.example.com/services/service2"
        binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="ServiceSoapBinding"
        contract="ServiceReference.Service2" name="ServiceImplPort" />
    ...
    ..
</client>

But it seems obvious that this is not the best solution to the problem, it becomes a bit unmanageable as the number of configuration alternatives grow. Any suggestions how to improve this are most welcome.

Regards, Ola

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There is a related discussion on MSDN Dev Center for "Conditional ClickOnce deployments as build configurations" that might be of interest. social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/winformssetup/thread/… –  Ola Theander Nov 1 '12 at 10:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Fortunately there is a great solution to this problem. Download and install MSBuild.Community.Tasks

Then check out the following posts for example usage

http://chris.widdowson.id.au/?p=781

http://grahamrhay.wordpress.com/2012/03/16/multiple-config-transforms-at-build-time/

warning it takes longer than 5 minutes to set up and you will be editing your .csproj file by hand

This solution does work very well, come back with any issues

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This solution works very well up to a point (in our case). The idea is basically to inject the correct config into app.config at build time using a "task" supported by MSBuild.Community.Tasks. We discovered that if you use Click-Once deployment to publish the application the Tasks doesn't run when publishing. I.e. when you use the normal build procedure from within Visual Studio it works perfectly but as soon as we publish (click-once deploy) the application, the app.config isn't updated thus it won't contain any end-point configuration at all. –  Ola Theander Dec 6 '12 at 9:51
    
@OlaTheander I am surprised by this. Is yours part of the build process? In ours we use a UsingTask TaskName="TransformXml" followed by a ` <Target Name="AfterCompile">` so that all the various configs are generated after each compile to an Intermediate Output Path. After this task(s) are used to copy the config file into place. –  wal Dec 6 '12 at 13:18
    
We used <Target Name="AfterBuild"> but I changed to AfterCompile but it didn't help. We publish from inside VS, using the Publish Now button on the Publish tab (VS 2010). After publishing, if I open the ****.exe.config.deploy file generated by the click-once deploy on the target server, typically in a sub-folder named something like APP-NAME_1_0_0_0, the config section for the endpoint is still <client><!-- Config for each env - see transform files --></client> i.e. the config file seems to be published as-is without the AfterCompile task updates. This is indeed very peculiar. –  Ola Theander Dec 11 '12 at 11:05

We've been very happy using an MSI package to deploy our applications (built with WiX) and a custom action that calls the XMLPreprocess executable that we package with our product. It basically uses XPath and some XML files we maintain with Excel to handle reconfiguring the app/web.config files. We've been using it for quite a while now and haven't had any problems with the product.

Here's a link: http://xmlpreprocess.codeplex.com/

It would be helpful if you were to elaborate on your deployment strategy to give some specific answers to your situation.

Edit: I should probably add this is for an internal product only, you wouldn't want to use this approach if you were giving the MSIs out externally.

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We did try wal's approach which almost solved the problem but we ran into problems with click-once deployment, see my comment to wal's answer.

The solution we're currently using is conditional compilation as suggested in this posting:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/451734/Visual-Studio-Use-Conditional-Compilation-to-Contr

The advantage is, apart from working flawlessly with click-once, is that you do not have to tweak the VS project file or use any third-party components. The disadvantage is that you need to update the source code if you want to add/change an endpoint.

What we did was to add a new .setttings file to the project. That's not mandatory but we though it was a good idea to keep the endpoint configuration in a separate settings file since this file must be tweaked slightly. It's tweaked to use conditional compilation to enable the correct endpoint based on the Configuration enabled for the compile:

    public ServiceSettings() {
        // // To add event handlers for saving and changing settings, uncomment the lines below:
        //
        // this.SettingChanging += this.SettingChangingEventHandler;
        //
        // this.SettingsSaving += this.SettingsSavingEventHandler;
        //

        // Each method corrsponds to a build version. We call all four methods, because
        // the conditional compilation will only compile the one indicated:
        this.SetLocalApplicationSettings();
        this.SetAS12ApplicationSettings();
    }

    [Conditional("LOCAL")]
    private void SetLocalApplicationSettings()
    {
        this["LoginAddress"] = "https://localhost/services/loginservice";
        this["SettingsAddress"] = "https://localhost/services/settingsservice";
    }

    [Conditional("EXAMPLE")]
    private void SetAS12ApplicationSettings()
    {
        this["LoginAddress"] = "https://example.com/services/loginservice";
        this["SettingsAddress"] = "https://example.com/services/settingsservice";
    }

In VS we created one configuration per endpoint and defined the proper conditional compilation symbol on the Build tab, i.e. LOCAL or EXAMPLE.

We also updated the code using the WS client classes generated by VS to use the endpoint defined in the settings file:

var client = new SettingsServiceClient("SettingsServiceImplPort",
    ServiceSettings.Default.SettingsAddress);

In the app.config we just kept the default configuration (localhost) and binding configuration to keep VS happy:

<system.serviceModel>
  <bindings>
    <customBinding>
      <binding name="SettingsServiceImplServiceSoapBinding">
        <textMessageEncoding messageVersion="Soap12" />
        <httpsTransport />
      </binding>
      <binding name="LoginServiceImplServiceSoapBinding">
        <textMessageEncoding messageVersion="Soap12" />
        <httpsTransport />
      </binding>
    </customBinding>
  </bindings>
  <client>
    <endpoint address="https://localhost/services/settingsservice"
      binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="SettingsServiceImplServiceSoapBinding"
      contract="SettingsServiceReference.SettingsService" name="SettingsServiceImplPort" />
    <endpoint address="https://localhost/services/loginservice"
      binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="LoginServiceImplServiceSoapBinding"
      contract="LoginServiceReference.LoginService" name="LoginServiceImplPort" />
  </client>
</system.serviceModel>
<applicationSettings>
    <ConfigurationTest.ServiceSettings>
        <setting name="SettingsAddress" serializeAs="String">
            <value>https://localhost/services/settingsservice</value>
        </setting>
        <setting name="LoginAddress" serializeAs="String">
            <value>https://localhost/services/loginservice</value>
        </setting>
    </ConfigurationTest.ServiceSettings>
</applicationSettings>
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