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I have coded like this:

$.ajax({ cache: false,
    url: "/Admin/Contents/GetData",
    data: { accountID: AccountID },
    success: function (data) {
        $('#CityID').html(data);
    },
    error: function (ajaxContext) {
        alert(ajaxContext.responseText)
    }
});

But when I look at the jQuery .ajax() documentation at the end it seems to suggest I should be coding like this below or at least it suggests adding a .done() and a .fail():

var request = $.ajax({ cache: false,
    url: "/Admin/Contents/GetData",
    data: { accountID: AccountID }
});

request.done(function (data) {
    xxx;
});
request.fail(function (jqXHR, textStatus) {
    xxx;
});

Update

If I code like this is it the same or is there some advantage to breaking it into three ?

$.ajax({ cache: false,
    url: "/Admin/Contents/GetData",
    data: { accountID: AccountID }
}).done(function (data) {
    xxx;
}).fail(function (jqXHR, textStatus) {
    xxx;
});
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 40 down vote accepted

As stated by user2246674, using success and error as parameter of the ajax function is valid.

To be consistent with precedent answer, reading the doc :

Deprecation Notice:

The jqXHR.success(), jqXHR.error(), and jqXHR.complete() callbacks will be deprecated in jQuery 1.8. To prepare your code for their eventual removal, use jqXHR.done(), jqXHR.fail(), and jqXHR.always() instead.

If you are using the callback-manipulation function (using method-chaining for example), use .done, .fail and .always instead of success, error and complete.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I thought but when I posted a few questions about status code earlier nobody was mentioning this even after I did. –  Alan Jun 7 '12 at 12:38
    
@Gemma Trust the Dev team, if they say that it may be removed in future versions and that it's better to use the new ones, use the new ones. –  Michael Laffargue Jun 7 '12 at 12:48
    
thanks and yes I will use the new way. Did you see my update at the end. I am wondering if my last code snippet is the best way to do it. I am not sure what the advantage of breaking up the code into three is. –  Alan Jun 7 '12 at 13:06
    
@Gemma it'll do the same thing, it's a coding technique called en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Method_chaining, there's pros and cons about using it. You may look at this for information : stackoverflow.com/questions/1103985/… –  Michael Laffargue Jun 7 '12 at 13:11
13  
I disagree. The references talks about the callback-manipulation functions (e.g. .error, .success) which are deprecated in favor of the more universal Deferred pattern, but the parameters to the ajax method are not deprecated and are both valid and acceptable - even in jQuery 1.9/2.0! In all current forms, ajax still returns a Deferred; possibly with already-attached Deferred callbacks. –  user2246674 Apr 18 '13 at 5:45

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