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First post here and it's and awk question.

I have a file that looks like this:

Motif name class from to strand sequence score
>ENSBTAG00000000436                         
MA0079.2 SP1 Zinc-coordinating 29 38 - agggggtggg 6.33
... (50 similar lines)
>ENSBTAG00000000380                         
MA0113.1 NR3C1 Zinc-coordinating 92 109 - ccagaaagtgcttctccc 7.03
... (57 similar lines)

and so on. Note that the >ENSBTA line is a 'label' for a set of records. So what I'd like is for the >ENSBTA line to be appended as a field in the lines beginning MA... i.e.

MA0079.2 SP1 Zinc-coordinating 29 38 - agggggtggg 6.33 >ENSBTAG00000000436

So far I have

awk '{if (NR>1&&NF==1) genename=$1; if (NR>1&&NF>1) print $0, genename}'

Which is quite close but it doesn't keep the ENST identifiers with the right lines. So referring to the example above not all 57 lines of the second part of the file get the correct identifier (ENSBTAG00000000380).

Could someone please suggest the best way to go about this?

Thanks

Iain

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not tested, but something like this ought to be close to what you want:

awk '/^>ENSBTAG/{tag=$0;}/^MA/{print $0,tag}'

That says essentially if the line matches ">ENSBTAG" at the beginning of the line, save that line in a variable, but if it matches "MA" at the beginning of the line, print the line with the latest tag appended.

If your record lines don't always match "^MA" (all the ones in the example do, but I don't want to assume that), or if the tags sometimes look a bit different, you'll need to modify the regexps accordingly.

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Thanks. This is great and a rather different approach from mine - so educational as well. –  duff Jun 7 '12 at 13:18

this oneliner would give you followings output(see test). the first line "Motif name class from to strand sequence score" would be printed as well.

awk '/^>[A-Z]*/{l=$0;next;}{print $0" "l}' file

test

kent$  cat a
Motif name class from to strand sequence score
>ENSBTAG00000000436
MA0079.2 SP1 Zinc-coordinating 29 38 - agggggtggg 6.33
MA0080.2 SP1 Zinc-coordinating 29 38 - agggggtggg 6.34
MA0082.2 SP1 Zinc-coordinating 29 38 - agggggtggg 6.35
>ENSBTAG00000000380
MA0113.1 NR3C1 Zinc-coordinating 92 109 - ccagaaagtgcttctccc 7.03
MA0113.1 NR3C1 Zinc-coordinating 92 109 - ccagaaagtgcttctccc 7.04
MA0113.1 NR3C1 Zinc-coordinating 92 109 - ccagaaagtgcttctccc 7.05

kent$  awk '/^>[A-Z]*/{l=$0;next;}{print $0" "l}' a
Motif name class from to strand sequence score 
MA0079.2 SP1 Zinc-coordinating 29 38 - agggggtggg 6.33 >ENSBTAG00000000436
MA0080.2 SP1 Zinc-coordinating 29 38 - agggggtggg 6.34 >ENSBTAG00000000436
MA0082.2 SP1 Zinc-coordinating 29 38 - agggggtggg 6.35 >ENSBTAG00000000436
MA0113.1 NR3C1 Zinc-coordinating 92 109 - ccagaaagtgcttctccc 7.03 >ENSBTAG00000000380
MA0113.1 NR3C1 Zinc-coordinating 92 109 - ccagaaagtgcttctccc 7.04 >ENSBTAG00000000380
MA0113.1 NR3C1 Zinc-coordinating 92 109 - ccagaaagtgcttctccc 7.05 >ENSBTAG00000000380
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Thanks Kent. This is great as well. It hadn't occurred to me to use regex for this as both of you have done. Need to brush up my approach! :-) –  duff Jun 7 '12 at 13:20

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