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I've just spent 3 hours debugging a bit of code only to find it was caused by me assuming that the execution order of the following code was linear:-

$.ajax( {ajax options} );
console.log('I was assuming this would execute once the ajax request was complete');

This isn't the first time that this has caused me problems and I was just wondering what the reason for this behavior was?

Is it so that any ajax requests don't hold up other script execution that may be unrelated to the ajax request?

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16  
The first A in AJAX stands for asynchronous. –  Gareth Jun 7 '12 at 13:01
3  
You can set option async: true. Synchronous requests may temporarily lock the browser, disabling any actions while the request is active. Not recommended. –  jasssonpet Jun 7 '12 at 13:04
    
@Gareth I was aware that the A stood for asynchronous, however I always thought this was referring to the fact that the request is made without 'reloading' the page, i.e. making the 'parent' http request again, hence the page is then 'not synchronized' with the original http request which delivered the page. –  rgvcorley Jun 7 '12 at 13:11
8  
+1 for this question, because it's about a misunderstanding of a fundamental and important point, it's very clearly written, and it's attracted some pretty decent (and not condescending!) answers. –  Tom Anderson Jun 7 '12 at 13:15
    
@rgvcorley Aah. No, as the answers below say, the call is asychronous and so returns immediately. The two ways of doing what you need are 1) turn asynch off (bad idea usually) or 2)use a callback on success. –  Gareth Jun 7 '12 at 13:15
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8 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Most of the other answers are answering how to deal with this. I'd like to look, very briefly, at why asynchronous is good in this case.

In fact, most in-browser Javascript is asynchronous. Take, for example, this code:

document.getElementById('foo').onclick = function() {
    alert('foo clicked');
};
document.getElementById('bar').onclick = function() {
    alert('bar clicked');
};

Which will run first? You don't know, because of the asynchronicity inherent to the browser model (or in fact most event-driven code). You run code when an event occurs. You set up the document, then wait for the event to happen, and your code could be executed in all kinds of different orders, depending on what events happen first. Javascript code needs to be executed during the whole lifetime of the page, not just when it's first created.

So in general Javascript programming (or at least, Javascript programming beyond the simplest level) is often going to be asynchronous. Furthermore, it makes a great deal of sense for HTTP requests to be asynchronous as well.

First, as you imply in your question, making the code synchronous would block execution. That is to say, you probably don't want to make an animation wait two seconds to start because you're making an HTTP request two lines further up. Server response times can be (a) irregular and (b) slow, so it makes no sense for the design of your application to depend on the speed of your server's response.

Second, and more importantly, your user isn't going to stop using the page because your script is making an AJAX call. Your user doesn't care. Your user probably will care that your normal onscroll behaviour isn't working because your script is currently tied up with an unrelated AJAX request. To tie in with the asynchronous nature of the whole of browser Javascript programming, the vast majority of HTTP calls should be non-blocking, asynchronous.

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This is just the answer I was looking for - you're right I wasn't looking for solutions to the problem (I was well aware of how to make the request synchronous) I wanted to know WHY it was asynchronous, so thankyou very much! –  rgvcorley Jun 7 '12 at 13:23
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because ajax is Asynchronous. if you want to execute something on the success of ajax call, use the success event

$.ajax({
  url: 'yourserverpage.php',
  success: function(data) {

    alert('This will be executed only when ajax call is success /finished');
  }
});

Asynchronous means ?

Asynchronous I/O, or non-blocking I/O, is a form of input/output processing that permits other processing to continue before the transmission has finished.Asynchronous I/O is used to improve throughput, latency, and/or responsiveness.

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Ok, great - I was aware that the A stood for asynchronous, however I always thought this was referring to the fact that the request is made without 'reloading' the page, (i.e. making the 'parent' http request again) hence the page is then 'not synchronized' with the original http request which delivered the page. –  rgvcorley Jun 7 '12 at 13:14
    
usually folks use ajax to do partial page updates without a complete page reload ( you might have seen in facebook, twitter, stackoverflow etc..) to give a nice user experience –  Shyju Jun 7 '12 at 13:15
    
...but that isn't what the asynchronous is referring to –  rgvcorley Jun 7 '12 at 13:28
3  
Downvoter, Would you please care to comment why ? –  Shyju Jun 7 '12 at 13:28
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To hold up AJAX Completion, you need to put your code inside success: function like below:

$.ajax({
  url: 'ajax/test.html',
  success: function(data) {
    // Do something after AJAX is completed.
    console.log('I was assuming this would execute once the ajax request was complete');
  }
});
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jQuery $.ajax() provides 4 (event) options that you could use: beforeSend, success, error, and complete. I think in your case, complete would be the right answer.

For example

$.ajax({
  url: someUrl,
  //...
  beforeSend: function(){
    console.log("I'm sending AJAX.");
    //display loading?
  },
  success: function(data){
    console.log('response: '+data);
  },
  error: function(er){
    console.log(er.responseText);
  },
  complete: function(){
    console.log("I'm done.");
    //hide loading?
  }
});
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$.ajax is an asynchronous function and as such does not wait for the request to complete, before returning. Instead, when the request has finished, it calls the callback functions, you specify by success and/or error.

If you really need a synchronous bahviour you can set the option async to false. (see docu). But in that case be aware, that you whole UI freezes until the request has finished!

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You can do success or you may also use .done();

$.ajax( {ajax options} ).done(console.log('I was assuming this would execute once the ajax request was complete'));  
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As the others have said, ajax stands for Asynchronous Javascript and Xml. That being said, you can do either of the following with jquerys ajax function:

  1. Set the "async" option to false, if you want the call to be synchronous. This is true by default. See the docs. As of jQuery 1.8, the use of this property is deprecated.

  2. Provide a "complete" callback. This will occur asynchronously by default. This is:

    A function to be called when the request finishes (after success and error callbacks are executed).

  3. Provide a "success" callback. This will occur asynchronously by default. This is:

    A function to be called if the request succeeds.

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I wasn't asking how to make the request synchronous - I was asking WHY it was asynchronous –  rgvcorley Jun 7 '12 at 13:30
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The first A in AJAX stands for Asynchronous; that means AJAX calls are executed in the background and do not hold up the execution of the script until they are finished. This is pretty much by design.

If you want to run some code when the call finishes, you can pass a function in one or more of the following parameters:

$.ajax({
  // your other options

  done: function(data, textStatus, jqXHR) {
    alert('Success! I got the following data back: ' + data);
    // this runs when the request has finished successfully
  },

  fail: function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
    alert('Oops, there was an error :(');
    // this runs when the request has finished, but with an error
  },

  always: function(jqXHR, textStatus) {
    alert("OK, I'm done.");
    // this runs when the call is finished, regardless
    // of whether it has succeeded or not
  }

For more info, check out the API: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax

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OMG, 6 other answers while I was writing mine... –  solymosi Jun 7 '12 at 13:17
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