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I'm using the GNU ARM toolchain (arm-elf-gcc). I have one assembly file and one c file that calls global methods defined in the assembly file. I can successfully call a single assembly method from c, but I cannot figure out how to call an assembly method that itself calls another assembly method. I'd like both assembly methods to be callable from c and be in the same file.

Here are the two file. When I run the program, it never returns, so I know there's a problem in the branching.

mathLib.s

@ ARM Assembler Library for absolute value

    .align 2                    @ Align to word boundary
    .arm                        @ This is ARM code
    .global asm_abs             @ This makes it a real symbol
    .global asm_two_abs         @ This makes it a real symbol

@ ABS Func. Compiler just does "rsblt   r0, r0, #0" but this is more fun.
    asm_abs:                        @ Start of function definition
        mov     r2, #1              @ Set the least bit high in r2
        mov     r2, r2, lsl#31      @ Shift that bit all the way to the sign slot
        orr     r2, r2, r0          @ XOR with input (r0) to set ensure negative
        cmp     r2, r0              @ compare a for-sure neg input with input
        bne     asm_abs_ret         @ if not equal, input was pos, so return
        sub     r0, r0, r0, lsl#1   @ else set input = input - (2*input)
    asm_abs_ret:
        mov     pc, lr              @ Set program counter to lr (was set by caller)

    asm_two_abs:                        @ Start of function definition
        bl      asm_abs                 @ Should set r0 = abs(r0)
        mov     r2, r0                  @ set r2 = r0
        mov     r0, r1                  @ set r0 = r1
        bl      asm_abs                 @ Should set r0 = abs(r0)
        add     r0, r0, r2              @ set r0 = r0 + r2  
        mov     pc, lr                  @ Set program counter to lr (was set by caller)

program.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    extern int asm_abs(int a);
    extern int asm_two_abs(int a, int b);

    int m = atoi(argv[1]);
    int n = atoi(argv[2]);
    int r = asm_two_abs(m, n); 

    printf("%d\n", r);

    return 0;
}

EDIT

Here is what I came up with in the end

@ ARM Assembler Library for absolute value

    .align 2                    @ Align to word boundary
    .arm                        @ This is ARM code
    .global asm_abs             @ This makes it a real symbol
    .global asm_mod             @ This makes it a real symbol


@ ABS Func. Compiler just does "rsblt   r0, r0, #0" but this is more fun.
@int asm_abs(int a)

asm_abs:                        @ start of function definition
    mov     r2, #1              @ set the least bit high in r2
    mov     r2, r2, lsl#31      @ shift that bit all the way to the sign slot
    orr     r2, r2, r0          @ XOR with input a (r0) to set ensure negative
    cmp     r2, r0              @ compare a for-sure neg input with input a
    bne     asm_abs_ret         @ if not equal, input was pos, so return
    sub     r0, r0, r0, lsl#1   @ else set a = a - (2*a)
asm_abs_ret:
    mov     pc, lr              @ set program counter to lr (was set by caller)

@ Take two numbers, and return abs(a) + abs(b)
@ int asm_two_abs(int a, int b)

asm_two_abs:                        @ start of function definition
    stmfd   sp!, {r4-r6}        @ push the non-scratch registers we'll use on the stack
    mov     r4, lr              @ store link register in r4
    mov     r6, r1              @ store second argument b in r6
    bl      asm_abs             @ set a (r0) = abs(a)
    mov     r5, r0              @ store abs(a) in r5
    mov     r0, r6              @ set r0 = b
    bl      asm_abs             @ should set b = abs(b)
    add     r0, r0, r5          @ set r0 = abs(b) + abs(a)  
    mov     lr, r4              @ restore link register
    ldmfd   sp!, {r4-r6}        @ restore non-scratch registers we used
    mov     pc, lr              @ set program counter to lr (was set by caller)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You are not preserving your link register.

bl branches to an address and sets the link register r14 to the return address

bl hello
asdf <- lr points here


hello:
  push {lr}
  bl there
  pop {lr}
  bx lr


there:
  stuff
  bx lr

Since hello calls another function it needs to save the link register to know how to get back to whomever called it. there does not as it does not bl to anyone else (does not modify lr).

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1  
shorter answer: The instruction bl modifies lr (r14), the first thing asm_two_abs does is modify r14, you need to preserve r14 so you can use it at the end (mov pc,lr) –  dwelch Jun 7 '12 at 15:32
4  
I would get into the habit of using bx lr, instead of mov pc,lr, unless you are on something older than an ARM7TDMI. –  dwelch Jun 7 '12 at 15:32
    
It's also common to push {r4, r5, lr} and later pop {r4, r5, pc}. –  Renate Aug 2 '13 at 12:11
    
yeah, I hate that pop{...pc} does two different things depending on the architecture...Also ARM has started encouraging or imposing multiples of 64 bits so instead of pushing three push{r4,r5,lr} they want some dummy register in there to keep the stack aligned push {r4,r5,r6,pc}. –  dwelch Aug 2 '13 at 14:12

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