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For initialising all the elements of a 100×100 two-dimensional array, we can do it in two ways:

Method 1:

int a[100][100];
for(i=0; i<100; i++){
    for(j=0; j<100; j++){
        a[i][j] = 10;
    }
}

Method 2:

int a[100][100];
for(j=0; j<100; j++){
    for(i=0; i<100; i++){
        a[i][j] = 10;
    }
}

Now my question is which of the method is more efficient and why?

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Or you could use memset((void *) a, 10, sizeof a); and not have to worry about row-major vs. column-major order. –  John Bode Jun 7 '12 at 14:32
    
@JohnBode, first the cast is not necessary, second this doesn't do what the question asks. It sets every byte of the array to 10. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 7 '12 at 14:43
    
Technically what you are doing is not initialization but assignment. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 7 '12 at 14:44
    
@JensGustedt: argh. Not enough caffeine. You're right. –  John Bode Jun 7 '12 at 15:28
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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The first method, since that will access the array sequentially.

C stores 2-dimensional arrays in row-major order, meaning that a[i][j] will be adjacent to a[i][j+1] but not adjacent to a[i+1][j].

Yet another way to say the same thing (that generalizes to >2 dimensions) is that the rightmost index is adjacent in memory. Or that incrementing an index means that you have to jump past all the dimensions to the right of the index you're incrementing.

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1  
You can't say the first method is faster (and even get 5 upvotes for it!). That is something that is definitely dependent on the hardware architecture. –  Visa is Racism Jun 7 '12 at 13:51
2  
@Shahbaz: In principle, sure, you're correct. In practice, can you provide me with an example of an architecture where strided memory access is faster than sequential? –  janneb Jun 7 '12 at 13:53
    
Imagine an architecture where multiple sections of ram could be read into cache simultaneously with a multicore CPU that reads these sections sequentially. I am not into specific vendor products to give you names, but this scenario is much closer to the nowadays reality than a simple 1980s computer where sequential read definitely meant faster –  Visa is Racism Jun 7 '12 at 14:01
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The C11 standard, section 6.5.2.1.3 indicates that arrays are stored row-major. This means that the first method is accessing memory sequentially, while the second one not. Depending on your CPU's caching mechanism, RAM access mechanism and the dimensions of the array, either could be faster. Generally though, I would say the first method is faster.

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1  
It's worth noting that this is not something new in C11; it's always been this way. Moreover, it's not explicit; it's just a consequence of the fact that C has no such thing as a "multi-dimensional array", only an "array of arrays", and the way the brackets bind in the declaration and the dereferencing, it results in a "row major" order. –  R.. Jun 7 '12 at 15:05
    
@R.., yeah, I just mentioned C11 because the section number in the other standards are probably different. The contents of these long standing sections are practically the same though. –  Visa is Racism Jun 7 '12 at 15:09
    
No problem. I just wanted to mention it, lest somebody misinterpret your answer as suggesting it's a new C11 requirement. –  R.. Jun 7 '12 at 15:11
    
@R.., thanks :) –  Visa is Racism Jun 7 '12 at 15:12
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When you declare an array like int a[100][100] its memory is laid out the same that if you declared int a[10000] which means that you can access all you cells successively if you just iterate on a.

The standard indicate that the array are stored by rows, which means your first hundred cells in memory will be a[0][0] to a[0][99] then a[1][0] to a[1][99].

On most CPUs, the first method will be faster since the CPU will be able to load (most of) your array into the CPU cache and therefore accessing it quickly. Note that this may vary between different CPUs.

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I would suspect both loops to be the same speed, and in fact for the generated code to be identical. Unless the array is volatile, the compiler has the freedom to switch the loops, and it should switch them to whichever order is better for the target machine.

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It depends whether the language you are using is a row-major or a column-major. Anything in the memory is laid out always in one dimensional manner, so all the 2D stuff also get converted in 1D way. Now note that there are two ways to do so.

  1. i*(no. of elements in a row) + j where i is the row no. and j is the column no.

  2. i*(no. of elements in a column) + j where i is the column number and j is the row number.

So here first one is a row-major way of converting 2D array into 1D way and second one is a column major way. Languages like C/C++ are row-major so they follow the first way.

Now observe that in the first way, you have point, (0,0) and (1,0) very very far depending upon the number of elements in the row, but (0,0) and (0,1) are adjacent.

So as a final answer, your question depends on programming language whether it is a row-major programming language or column-major. In C/C++ as they are row-major so the first one will be faster.

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