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How can I check what version of the Python Interpreter is interpreting my script?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 291 down vote accepted

This information is available in the sys.version string in the sys module:

>>> import sys

Human readable:

>>> print (sys.version) #parentheses necessary in python 3.       
2.5.2 (r252:60911, Jul 31 2008, 17:28:52) 
[GCC 4.2.3 (Ubuntu 4.2.3-2ubuntu7)]

For further processing:

>>> sys.version_info
(2, 5, 2, 'final', 0)
# or
>>> sys.hexversion
34014192
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I like sys.hexversion for stuff like this.

http://docs.python.org/library/sys.html#sys.hexversion

>>> import sys
>>> sys.hexversion
33883376
>>> '%x' % sys.hexversion
'20504f0'
>>> sys.hexversion < 0x02060000
True
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That's a nifty version feature I hadn't seen, and a bit easier to use (at least to me) than the regular version... –  Wayne Werner Jun 10 '10 at 20:14
2  
@sorin: can you explain how this is better than for example Seth's answer? Since you state this is the best, I'm wondering. –  0xC0000022L Jun 3 '13 at 16:21
1  
@0xC0000022L Had you ever wondered how you would be able to compare the text from the tuple? How does 'final' compares to beta, rc, or whatever it could be there. Instead if you have a numeric value, you will always be able to specify an exact version. –  sorin Jun 4 '13 at 10:52
1  
@sorin: uhm, that doesn't exactly matter, does it? If I compare against (2,6,4) the 'final' doesn't seem to affect the comparison and it isn't supposed to. Apparently no slicing is needed when I compare the "most significant" parts of the tuple. This seems to be how it's treated and that's what my question was about. I'm not saying this solution doesn't have its merit, I'm just wondering why it's the best - i.e. what I am missing. –  0xC0000022L Jun 4 '13 at 10:57
2  
The release level is defined to be one of 'alpha', 'beta', 'candidate', or 'final' which also happens to be compare correctly... –  Fredrik Jul 22 '13 at 19:56

Your best bet is probably something like so:

>>> import sys
>>> sys.version_info
(2, 6, 4, 'final', 0)
>>> if not sys.version_info[:2] == (2, 6):
...    print "Error, I need python 2.6"
... else:
...    from my_module import twoPointSixCode
>>> 

Additionally, you can always wrap your imports in a simple try, which should catch syntax errors. And, to @Heikki's point, this code will be compatible with much older versions of python:

>>> try:
...     from my_module import twoPointSixCode
... except Exception: 
...     print "can't import, probably because your python is too old!"
>>>
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1  
Why a bare except instead of except Exception? –  Roger Pate Jun 10 '10 at 21:12
2  
@Roger - yeah, I fixed it :D –  Seth Jun 10 '10 at 23:38
    
Why a plain Exception and not an ImportError? :P –  deadly Oct 15 '13 at 9:54
1  
@deadly - ImportError won't catch SyntaxErrors, which will be thrown if you try to use a new syntax in an old python, such as trying to use the shortcut conditional in pre-2.5. –  Seth Oct 22 '13 at 5:24

Put something like:

#!/usr/bin/env/python
import sys
if sys.version_info<(2,6,0):
  sys.stderr.write("You need python 2.6 or later to run this script\n")
  exit(1)

at the top of your script.

Note that depending on what else is in your script, older versions of python than the target may not be able to even load the script, so won't get far enough to report this error. As a workaround, you can run the above in a script that imports the script with the more modern code.

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2  
This is incorrect (or at least, incomplete) because the old interpreters will barf on newer language constructs such as x if Pred() else y. They will die during the "lexing" phase, and never have a chance to actually execute exit(1). Seth's answer is correct in encapsulating the new language features in other files. –  Mark Rushakoff Jun 10 '10 at 16:20
1  
@MarkRushakoff: your comment is confusing. Which aspect of this answer is wrong? The missing else branch or that a < is used for version_info? AFAIK Python pads missing values in tuples, and all of this should be valid before 2.6, no? So Seth's answer uses slicing (redundantly) while this one doesn't and that makes your comment even more confusing. –  0xC0000022L Jun 3 '13 at 16:19
2  
I think what @MarkRushakoff is saying is that if you have this at the top of a file, and a new language feature elsewhere in the same file, the old version of python will die when loading the file, before it runs any of it, so the error won't be shown. Basically you have to put the above (or another check) at the top of a file, then import the code that requires a new version of python from separate files. –  rjmunro Jun 3 '13 at 17:44
    
Yep, what @rjmunro said :) –  Mark Rushakoff Jun 4 '13 at 3:48

From the command line:

python -V

This is documented in 'man python'.

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5  
The question is not "How do I check what version of python I have installed?" Many of the other answers are correct. –  carrier Jul 23 '13 at 16:40

I found this method somewhere.

>>> from platform import python_version
>>> print python_version()
2.7.8
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Like Seth said, the main script could check sys.version_info (but note that that didn't appear until 2.0, so if you want to support older versions you would need to check another version property of the sys module).

But you still need to take care of not using any Python language features in the file that are not available in older Python versions. For example, this is allowed in Python 2.5 and later:

try:
    pass
except:
    pass
finally:
    pass

but won't work in older Python versions, because you could only have except OR finally match the try. So for compatibility with older Python versions you need to write:

try:
    try:
        pass
    except:
        pass
finally:
    pass
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if you are working on linux just give command "python" output will be like this

**Python 2.4.3 (#1, Jun 11 2009, 14:09:37)

[GCC 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-44)] on linux2

Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.**

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1  
I want my python script to be able to obtain the version of python that is interpreting it. The correct answer has been accepted. –  carrier Jul 16 '13 at 17:42
import sys
sys.version.split(' ')[0]

sys.version gives you what you want, just pick the first number :)

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5  
sys.version_info is already a tuple. –  0xC0000022L Jun 3 '13 at 16:20

To see a MSDOS script to check the version before running the Python interpreter (to avoid Python version syntax exceptions) See solution:

Python: Best way to check for Python version in program that uses new language features?

and

MS script; Python version check prelaunch of Python module http://pastebin.com/aAuJ91FQ (script likely easy to convert to other OS scripts.)

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Here's a short commandline version which exits straight away (handy for scripts and automated execution):

python -c 'print __import__("sys").version'

Or just the major, minor and micro:

python -c 'print __import__("sys").version_info[:1]' # (2,)
python -c 'print __import__("sys").version_info[:2]' # (2, 7)
python -c 'print __import__("sys").version_info[:3]' # (2, 7, 6)
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