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I am doing some c++ practice and trying to write a program to count the amount of times a dice combination is rolled after 10000 attempts. I have used a 2D array to store every possible dice combination, and I perform 10000 rand()%6+1 and increments the value in the memory allocation it randoms.

This is my attempt.

cout << "\nDice roll analyser" << endl;

const int first = 6;
const int second = 6;
int nRolls[first][second];
int count = 0;

while (count < 10000){
    nRolls[rand()%6+1][rand()%6+1]+=1;
    count++;
}

for (int i=0;i<first;i++){
    for (int j=0;j<second;j++){
        cout << nRolls[i][j] << " ";
    }
}

This is the output that I get;

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 269 303 265 270 264 228 289 272 294 290 269 262 294 303 277 265 294 288 266 313 274 301 245 317 276 292 284 264 260

What I am trying to achieve is the amount of times each combination is rolled e.g. how many times 1, 6 is rolled etc.

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5  
So what is your question? –  Chris Dargis Jun 7 '12 at 14:05
2  
This is all very nice, but what's the problem/question? –  Florin Stingaciu Jun 7 '12 at 14:06
4  
might be a good idea to initialise the array counts to zero before you start?? –  mathematician1975 Jun 7 '12 at 14:09
    
fixed the question to reflect the result i am looking for. –  xxnaa Jun 7 '12 at 14:10
    
@pjmil116 Check out the above comment. That might fix your issue. –  Florin Stingaciu Jun 7 '12 at 14:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You never update your count.

For something where you want to run a code segment n times, where right now n = 10000, this is the general way you wanna do it.

for (int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
{
    //loop code.
}

additionally, myVariable+=1 can always be simplified to either ++myVariable or myVariable++ (if you aren't use the value of myVariable right when you are assigning it, it is better to use the first one. More info on pre/post increment can be found here: http://gd.tuwien.ac.at/languages/c/programming-bbrown/c_015.htm

so instead of nRolls[rand()%6+1][rand()%6+1]+=1; you can instead do

++(nRolls[rand()%6+1][rand()%6+1]);

Additionally, arrays are zero-indexed, meaning when you do rand()%6+1 you are restricting the values from 1 to 6 and leaving out the 0 position of an array, which is the first one, so consider instead just using

++(nRolls[rand()%6][rand()%6]);

then, to find out how often you roll a (i,j), where i and j are between 1 and 6,

cout << "(" << i << "," << j << "):" << nRolls[i-1][j-1] << endl;
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You will have a problem here because you are adding +1 to rand()%6 you will never increment the count of any of elements with index zero. The minimum element index you allow to be incremented starts at 1.

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Exactly, arrays go from 0 to n-1. –  jpyllman Jun 7 '12 at 14:38

OK, thanks for the help. This is the updated code that displays correctly!

cout << "\nDice roll analyzer" << endl;

srand(time(0));

const int first = 6;
const int second = 6;
int nRolls[first][second];
int count = 0;

while (count < 10000){
    nRolls[rand()%6][rand()%6]++;
    count++;
}

for (int i=0;i<first;i++){
    for (int j=0;j<second;j++){
        cout << "(" << i+1 << "," << j+1 << ")" << nRolls[i][j] << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
You should really, really, really, really use for loops to do n executions for the same line of code. –  Hans Z Jun 7 '12 at 14:41
    
instead of the while loop? –  xxnaa Jun 7 '12 at 15:34
1  
yes. when you do int count = 0; while (count < 10000) { count++; } that's literally what for(int count = 0; count < 10000; count++) is resolved to by the compiler. –  Hans Z Jun 7 '12 at 15:42

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