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Is it possible in pure css, that is without adding additional html tags, to make a line break like <br>? I want the line break after the <h4> tag, but not before:

HTML

<li>
  Text, text, text, text, text. <h4>Sub header</h4>
  Text, text, text, text, text.
</li>

CSS

h4 {
  display: inline;
}

I have found many questions like this, but always with answers like "use display: block;", which I can't do, when the <h4> must stay on the same line.

share|improve this question
    
Why is this element an h4? Why do you use it in a place like this? –  Tom Jun 7 '12 at 14:31
    
Our of curiosity, what is the reason you don't want to use <br/>? –  PhilipK Jun 7 '12 at 14:34
    
The reason: I have an awfull lot of list elements. And I was also wondering if an elegant solution exists. It is usually not nice to use br tags between elements (and I see the header as an element of its own) –  Steeven Jun 7 '12 at 14:43
    
@Tom, this is a simplified example. I have som text and headers in each list element. –  Steeven Jun 7 '12 at 14:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 27 down vote accepted

It works like this:

h4 {
    display:inline;
}
h4:after {
    content:"\a";
    white-space: pre;
}

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/Bb2d7/

The trick comes from here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/66000/509752 (to have more explanation)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice. What does the \a do? –  Steeven Jun 7 '12 at 14:57
2  
\a means line break, character U+000A, and white-space: pre tells browsers to treat it as a line break in rendering. –  Jukka K. Korpela Jun 7 '12 at 16:08
    
Okay, thanks @JukkaK.Korpela. Then why isn't it rendered as a line break in the first place? Though this solution is simple, it still would override other white-space commands. –  Steeven Jun 7 '12 at 22:52
2  
@Steeven, it only overrides the initial value for white-space on the :after pseudo-element, which contains just the line break. And it is needed because in HTML, by default, a line break in element content is equivalent to a space and does not cause a line break in the rendered document. –  Jukka K. Korpela Jun 8 '12 at 2:36
2  
@Alshten, thanks, makes sense & totally weirds me out at the same time. –  sonjz Feb 4 '13 at 21:58

Use :after (example):

h4 {
    display:inline;
}
h4:after {
    content:" ";
    overflow:hidden;
    color:transparent;
    display: block;
}

Note: Regrettably, there is a bug in Chrome that causes this not to work. Alternatively, you can use the method pointed out by Alshten (example):

h4 {
    display:inline;
}
h4:after {
    content:"\a";
    white-space:pre;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see this works in IE, but not in Chrome unfortunately. –  Steeven Jun 7 '12 at 14:39
    
@Steeven, looks like a bug in Chrome. Works in Fx as well. I'll see if I can find a workaround. –  bfrohs Jun 7 '12 at 14:42
    
@Steeven, added workaround from Alshten's answer. –  bfrohs Jun 7 '12 at 14:48

Try

h4{ display:block;}

in your css

http://jsfiddle.net/ZrJP6/

share|improve this answer
1  
plus some judicious use of margin-bottom should get you there. –  Jeremy Holovacs Jun 7 '12 at 14:31
2  
But if I understand well, the h4 has to be on the same line as the text before. With display:block, there's a line break before the h4. –  Alshten Jun 7 '12 at 14:35
    
What? margin-bottom will put the h4 at the same line as the preceding text? –  Steeven Jun 7 '12 at 14:36

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