Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am quite new to regex, and I use them only for searching. So I play around with egrep, but with egrep I see some limitations.

For linux are there any good tool for regex? I know there is sed but its usually used in scenarios to search and replace. Can I used sed only to search through my files ? If yes how ?

Coming to my specific question, I need to search for instances in C source code where additional parentheses are used for if statements.

if (( a == b)) should match and if (a == b) should not match.
if(a && ((b||c))) should match and if(a && (b||c)) should not match.

I want it to be simple, I will add additional cases later like >= != etc.

share|improve this question
4  
This is not possible with regexes (at least not on their own), as they cannot keep track of arbitrary levels of nesting of parentheses. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 7 '12 at 14:35
    
Why the down vote ?? hmmm... –  ZEN.Kamath Jun 7 '12 at 14:36
    
@Oli Charlesworth, you should make that an answer, at it is the answer. –  Jeremy Stein Jun 7 '12 at 14:37
    
Ok, wat about sed as search tool and not search and replace ?? –  ZEN.Kamath Jun 7 '12 at 14:38
    
@JeremyStein: I have made it so! My initial hesitation was because normally a "good answer" should be accompanied with a recommendation of what to do instead. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 7 '12 at 14:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is not possible with regexes (at least not on their own), as they cannot keep track of arbitrary levels of nesting of parentheses.

share|improve this answer
2  
To add to this answer, be careful attempting this even outside of regex. The only (practical) way to ensure you're detecting a truly "unnecessary" set of parentheses, is to see a double-open closed by a double-close, e.g. (( ... )). A non-regex-only solution might search for /\(\s*\(/, then read char by char, counting levels, until a closing parenthesis is found at level 0, and here if we match /\)\s*\)/, then we might know it's a redundant pair of parentheses--barring of course things we didn't anticipate, e.g. a stray parenthesis or emoticon in a comment ;) –  Andrew Cheong Jun 7 '12 at 15:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.