Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My Question: How to execute a bunch of threaded objects on a ThreadPoolExecutor and wait for them all to finish before moving on?

I'm new to ThreadPoolExecutor. So this code is a test to learn how it works. Right now I don't even fill the BlockingQueue with the objects because I don't understand how to start the queue without calling execute() with another RunnableObject. Anyway, right now I just call awaitTermination() but I think I'm still missing something. Any tips would be great! Thanks.

public void testThreadPoolExecutor() throws InterruptedException {
  int limit = 20;
  BlockingQueue q = new ArrayBlockingQueue(limit);
  ThreadPoolExecutor ex = new ThreadPoolExecutor(limit, limit, 20, TimeUnit.SECONDS, q);
  for (int i = 0; i < limit; i++) {
    ex.execute(new RunnableObject(i + 1));
  }
  ex.awaitTermination(2, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
  System.out.println("finished");
}

The RunnableObject class:

package playground;

public class RunnableObject implements Runnable {

  private final int id;

  public RunnableObject(int id) {
    this.id = id;
  }

  @Override
  public void run() {
    System.out.println("ID: " + id + " started");
    try {
      Thread.sleep(2354);
    } catch (InterruptedException ignore) {
    }
    System.out.println("ID: " + id + " ended");
  }
}
share|improve this question
1  
I don't think it's a good idea to answer your question immediately after you post it and suggest that your own answer is not quite fitting. At best, that warrants and update to your original question explaining why that answer is not sufficient. –  Lirik Jun 7 '12 at 14:59
    
@Link, you're right. I'll fix it. –  kentcdodds Jun 7 '12 at 15:01
    
I just edited my answer to show one way to wait for all of the jobs to finish before shutting down the executor. –  Gray Jun 7 '12 at 15:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You should loop on awaitTermination

ExecutorService threads;
// ...
// Tell threads to finish off.
threads.shutdown();
// Wait for everything to finish.
while (!threads.awaitTermination(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS)) {
  log.info("Awaiting completion of threads.");
}
share|improve this answer
    
That totally did it. I didn't notice that awaitTermination returns anything. Nobody else mentioned that I'd need to loop through it to block. Thanks! –  kentcdodds Jun 7 '12 at 16:19
2  
Why do it in a loop? Why not just increase the number of seconds to wait for it. Typically I do a awaitTermination(Long.MAX_VALUE, TimeUnit.SECONDS) or something. –  Gray Jun 7 '12 at 17:01
    
@Gray - I initially just called it once in a piece of code of mine and either really strange things started happening on exit sometimes or everything locked up. Eventually I tracked it down to this so now I loop and log a "waiting" message so I know something strange is going on. –  OldCurmudgeon Jun 7 '12 at 19:07
1  
Downvote?? Why? –  OldCurmudgeon Jun 9 '12 at 0:12
    
+1 for simple and straightforward solution. –  LihO Oct 29 '13 at 16:37

It's nothing to do with the executor itself. Just use the interface's java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService.invokeAll(Collection<? extends Callable<T>>). It will block until all the Callables are finished.

Executors are meant to be long-lived; beyond the lifetime of a group of tasks. shutdown is for when the application is finished and cleaning up.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you elaborate on this answer. I'm liking the answer, but I'm having a hard time implementing it. Thanks –  kentcdodds Jun 7 '12 at 15:20

Your issue seems to be that you are not calling shutdown after you have submitted all of the jobs to your pool. Without shutdown() your awaitTermination will always return false.

ThreadPoolExecutor ex =
    new ThreadPoolExecutor(limit, limit, 20, TimeUnit.SECONDS, q);
for (int i = 0; i < limit; i++) {
  ex.execute(new RunnableObject(i + 1));
}
// you are missing this line!!
ex.shutdown();
ex.awaitTermination(2, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

You can also do something like the following to wait for all your jobs to finish:

List<Future<Object>> futures = new ArrayList<Future<Object>>();
for (int i = 0; i < limit; i++) {
  futures.add(ex.submit(new RunnableObject(i + 1), (Object)null));
}
for (Future<Object> future : futures) {
   // this joins with the submitted job
   future.get();
}
...
// still need to shutdown at the end
ex.shutdown();

Also, because you are sleeping for 2354 milliseconds but only waiting for the termination of all of the jobs for 2 SECONDS, awaitTermination will always return false.

Lastly, it sounds like you are worrying about created a new ThreadPoolExecutor and you instead want to reuse the first one. Don't be. The GC overhead is going to be extremely minimal compared to any code that you write to detect if the jobs are finished.


To quote from the javadocs, ThreadPoolExecutor.shutdown():

Initiates an orderly shutdown in which previously submitted tasks are executed, but no new tasks will be accepted. Invocation has no additional effect if already shut down.

In the ThreadPoolExecutor.awaitTermination(...) method, it is waiting for the state of the executor to go to TERMINATED. But first the state must go to SHUTDOWN if shutdown() is called or STOP if shutdownNow() is called.

share|improve this answer

Another approach is to use CompletionService, very useful if you have to attempt any task result:

//run 3 task at time
final int numParallelThreads = 3;

//I used newFixedThreadPool for convenience but if you need you can use ThreadPoolExecutor
ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(numParallelThreads);
CompletionService<String> completionService = new ExecutorCompletionService<String>(executor);

int numTaskToStart = 15;

for(int i=0; i<numTaskToStart ; i++){
    //task class that implements Callable<String> (or something you need)
    MyTask mt = new MyTask();

    completionService.submit(mt);
}

executor.shutdown(); //it cannot be queued more task

try {
    for (int t = 0; t < numTaskToStart ; t++) {
        Future<String> f = completionService.take();
        String result = f.get();
        // ... something to do ...
    }
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    //termination of all started tasks (it returns all not started tasks in queue)
    executor.shutdownNow();
} catch (ExecutionException e) {
    // ... something to catch ...
}
share|improve this answer

Try this,

ThreadPoolExecutor ex =
    new ThreadPoolExecutor(limit, limit, 20, TimeUnit.SECONDS, q);
for (int i = 0; i < limit; i++) {
  ex.execute(new RunnableObject(i + 1));
}

Lines to be added

ex.shutdown();
ex.awaitTermination(timeout, unit)
share|improve this answer
    
you should check on the returned boolean from await termination and keep trying until you get true. –  SamK42 Jul 20 at 20:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.