Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to do something like

Action<FileInfo> deleter = f =>
    {
        if (....) // delete condition here
        {
            System.IO.File.Delete(f.FullName);
        }
    };

DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(_path);

di.GetFiles("*.pdf").Select(deleter); // <= Does not compile!
di.GetFiles("*.txt").Select(deleter); // <= Does not compile!
di.GetFiles("*.dat").Select(deleter); // <= Does not compile!

in order to delete old files from a directory. But I do not know how to directly apply the delegate to the FilInfo[] without an explicit foreach (the idea listed above does not work of course).

Is it possible?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Select() is used to project items from TSource to TResult. In your case, you do not need Select because you're not projecting. Instead, use List<T>s ForEach method to delete files:

di.GetFiles("*.pdf").ToList().ForEach(deleter);
share|improve this answer
    
Does not seem to work, perhaps Panagiotis Kanavos is right in its comment when he says that the expression will not be evaluated until enumerated, so the files will not be deleted? –  Cristiano Jun 7 '12 at 15:24
    
Sorry, I was wrong, this works! –  Cristiano Jun 7 '12 at 15:29

As DarkGray suggests you could, if somewhat unusually, utilise the Select to firstly action the file, and then return a null collection. I would recommend utilising the ForEach extension, like so:

ForEach LINQ Extension

public static void ForEach<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Action<T> action)
{
    foreach(TSource item in source)
     {
        action(item);
    }
}

You should then be able to execute the action on the array of FileInfo, as array is an enumerator. Like so:

Execution

Action<FileInfo> deleter = f =>
{
    if (....) // delete condition here
    {
        System.IO.File.Delete(f.FullName);
    }
};

DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(_path);
di.GetFiles("*.pdf").ForEach(deleter);

Edit by Richard.
I do want to raise attention to the argument of foreach vs ForEach. In my opinion the ForEach statement should directly effect the object being passed in, and in this case it does. So I've contradicted myself. Oops! :)

share|improve this answer
2  
Obligatory link to why IEnumerable<> wasn't given a ForEach extension method –  AakashM Jun 7 '12 at 15:24
    
@AakashM I agree with the author when says "this is harder to debug", but I think this is not "harder to read". –  Cristiano Jun 7 '12 at 15:27
di.GetFiles("*.pdf").Select(_=>{deleter(_);return null;}); 

or

di.GetFiles("*.pdf").ForEach(action); 

public static class Hlp
{
 static public void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Action<T> action)
 {
   foreach (var item in items)
     action(item);
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It won't compile because GetFiles returns an array of FileInfo but ForEach is definied on List<T>, so you're missing a ToList() in between. –  nemesv Jun 7 '12 at 15:13
    
I have not the ForEach method, perhaps have been introduced with a recent .NET version? –  Cristiano Jun 7 '12 at 15:13
    
ForEach is a static method of Array or an instance method of List<T>. It can't be called in this fashion. What's more, Select will not be called unless the resulting enumerable is enumerated. The files will not be deleted –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jun 7 '12 at 15:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.