Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Consider this object in javascript,

var obj = { a : { b: 1, c: 2 } };

given the string "obj.a.b" how can I get the object this refers to, so that I may alter its value? i.e. I want to be able to do something like

obj.a.b = 5;
obj.a.c = 10;

where "obj.a.b" & "obj.a.c" are strings (not obj references). I came across this post where I can get the value the dot notation string is referring to obj but what I need is a way I can get at the object itself?

The nesting of the object may be even deeper than this. i.e. maybe

var obj = { a: { b: 1, c : { d : 3, e : 4}, f: 5 } }
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 51 down vote accepted

To obtain the value, consider:

function ref(obj, str) {
    str = str.split(".");
    for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++)
        obj = obj[str[i]];
    return obj;
}

var obj = { a: { b: 1, c : { d : 3, e : 4}, f: 5 } }
str = 'a.c.d'
ref(obj, str) // 3

or in a more fancy way, using reduce:

function ref(obj, str) {
    return str.split(".").reduce(function(o, x) { return o[x] }, obj);
}

Returning an assignable reference to an object member is not possible in javascript, you'll have to use a function like the following:

function set(obj, str, val) {
    str = str.split(".");
    while (str.length > 1)
        obj = obj[str.shift()];
    return obj[str.shift()] = val;
}

var obj = { a: { b: 1, c : { d : 3, e : 4}, f: 5 } }
str = 'a.c.d'
set(obj, str, 99)
console.log(obj.a.c.d) // 99

or use ref given above to obtain the reference to the containing object and then apply the [] operator to it:

parts = str.split(/\.(?=[^.]+$)/)  // Split "foo.bar.baz" into ["foo.bar", "baz"]
ref(obj, parts[0])[parts[1]] = 99
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks the second part is what I was looking for and seems to be working fine. –  source.rar Jun 7 '12 at 15:40
    
+1 Didn't see your reduce example at first. –  squint Jun 7 '12 at 16:30
    
I'd really appreciate if you'd elaborate on set() and the split(/\.(?=[^.]+$)/) example some more. –  Redsandro Oct 30 '12 at 17:30
    
@Redsandro: hmm, do you have any questions? The code looks pretty straightforward to me. –  georg Oct 30 '12 at 22:28
    
It's clear now. I was confused because in set() you use a different 'array traversing technique' than in the first ref() and I was trying to figure out why that was necesary - it's not, but it keeps things interesting. As for the last one, the regex confused me but I added comment to the code. –  Redsandro Oct 31 '12 at 11:47

Similar to thg435's answer, but with argument checks and supports nest levels where one of the ancestor levels isn't yet defined or isn't an object.

setObjByString = function(obj, str, val) {
    var keys, key;
    //make sure str is a string with length
    if (!str || !str.length || Object.prototype.toString.call(str) !== "[object String]") {
        return false;
    }
    if (obj !== Object(obj)) {
        //if it's not an object, make it one
        obj = {};
    }
    keys = str.split(".");
    while (keys.length > 1) {
        key = keys.shift();
        if (obj !== Object(obj)) {
            //if it's not an object, make it one
            obj = {};
        }
        if (!(key in obj)) {
            //if obj doesn't contain the key, add it and set it to an empty object
            obj[key] = {};
        }
        obj = obj[key];
    }
    return obj[keys[0]] = val;
};

Usage:

var obj;
setObjByString(obj, "a.b.c.d.e.f", "hello");
share|improve this answer

If this javascript runs in a browser then you can access the object like this:

window['obj']['a']['b'] = 5

So given the string "obj.a.b" you have to split the it by .:

var s = "obj.a.b"
var e = s.split(".")
window[e[0]][e[1]][e[2]] = 5
share|improve this answer
1  
What if it has more nested levels? –  source.rar Jun 7 '12 at 15:23
    
Is the number of nested levels unknown? –  WojtekT Jun 7 '12 at 15:24
3  
Yes. If it is unknown what way would there be to modify it? –  source.rar Jun 7 '12 at 15:25
var obj = { a : { b: 1, c: 2 } };
walkObject(obj,"a.b"); // 1

function walkObject( obj, path ){
  var parts = path.split("."), i=0, part;
  while (obj && (part=parts[i++])) obj=obj[part];
  return obj;
}

Or if you like your code terse:

function walkObject( o, path ){
  for (var a,p=path.split('.'),i=0; o&&(a=p[i++]); o=o[a]);
  return o;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't this just get me the value of the dot-notation string? And not the object itself which I can modify? –  source.rar Jun 7 '12 at 15:34
    
@source.rar This returns you the value that is at the end of the chain, as shown on the second line. If that value is an object, then you will get an object back (e.g. walkObject(obj,'a') // {b:1,c:2}). –  Phrogz Jun 7 '12 at 17:11

Returning an assignable reference to an object member is not possible in javascript. You can assign value to a deep object member by dot notation with a single line of code like this.

new Function('_', 'val', '_.' + path + ' = val')(obj, value);

In you case:

var obj = { a : { b: 1, c: 2 } };

new Function('_', 'val', '_.a.b' + ' = val')(obj, 5); // Now obj.a.b will be equal to 5
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.