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According to the language specification lock(obj) statement; would be compiled as:

object lockObj = obj; // (the langspec doesn't mention this var, but it wouldn't be safe without it)
Monitor.Enter(lockObj);
try
{
    statement;
}
finally
{
    Monitor.Exit(lockObj);
}

However, it is compiled as:

try
{
    object lockObj = obj;
    bool lockTaken = false;
    Monitor.Enter(lockObj, ref lockTaken);
    statement;
}
finally
{
    if (lockTaken) Monitor.Exit(lockObj);
}

That seems to be a lot more complicated than necessary. So the question is, what's the advantage of that implementation?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As always, Eric Lippert has already answered this:

Fabulous Adventures In Coding: Locks and exceptions do not mix

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I was about to answer myself after having thought about another answer that was unfortunately deleted before I could comment on it. Made me think more about when exceptions could be thrown, threads being interrupted possibly anywhere, etc. It was quite obvious then that Monitor.Enter could return successfully, but before the thread enters the try block it could get interrupted. Sometimes this site is too fast to honor all the people who helped finding the answer. –  Wormbo Jun 7 '12 at 15:59

Recently I read in "CLR via C#" that it might not actually be an advantage. The reasoning is that the finally block always releases the locked resource, even if the try block exited as a result of an unexpected error. That might leave the resource in an undefined state and accessible. The program won't deadlock, but the error may be a lot more subtle and thus harder to find.

It certainly depends on the situation, but I guess the current implementation of lock makes most sense if your priority is to prevent deadlocks due to unexpected interruption of threads at the worst spot possible.

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