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I really don't have a clue how to give this question a good title - sorry for that.

Just to know what's the goal of all this: pass a uint8_t variable pointer to bar() which does set it to 1 or 0, that I can check it's state inside my main. I do need zbar(), it's a thread and it does actually setting the value to 1 or 0

So I have somewhere:

struct foo_t {
    ...
    uint8_t *state;
};

and in main I go with:

int main(void) {
     uint8_t state = 0;
     bar(&state);

     while(1) {
          if(state)
              //do something here
     }
}

and here we have somewhere else in another sourcefile.

void bar(uint8_t *state) {
    struct foo_t *foo;    //using malloc here - don't worry

    foo->state = state;

    zbar(foo); 

}

void zbar(struct foo_t *arg) {
    if(condition)
       arg->state = 1;
    else
       arg->state = 0;
 }

How to make this working? o0 zBar can actually access the arg struct, that's not the problem at all.

Please don't worry why I do it so strange, it's used within threads etc.

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Your question as it is currently written makes no sense. There's no question in what you wrote, what do you want us to do? –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jun 7 '12 at 15:51
    
I want to pass the pointer wich i pass to bar() to zbar, which then does change the value of the variable WITH the address state to 1 or 0, that I can read out state in my main. I guess the over all question is: How can I access the value of a variable which is a pointer member in a struct where i get the pointer from the struct >.< –  Joel Bodenmann Jun 7 '12 at 15:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume you meant void bar(uint8_t* state)?

It does not do what I think you intended. Again I assume you want the state variable in main to be changed? If so try

struct foo_t {
    uint8_t* state; // changed this to a pointer type.
}

void bar(uint8_t* state) {
    struct foo_t *foo = blah blah;
    foo->state = state;
    zbar(foo);
}

void zbar(foo_t* arg) {
   if (condition)
       *(arg->state) = 1;
   else
       *(arg->state) = 0;
}

I tihnk this is what you're trying to do

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aaah! That was helpful, thanks for your help :) and yes, this is what I want to do :D –  Joel Bodenmann Jun 7 '12 at 16:01

bar() needs to take its parameter via pointer. Also, if you want to check the state in main, you will need to change the pointed-to bool after calling zBar

void bar(uint8_t* state) {
  struct foo_t *foo; //using malloc here - don't worry
  foo->state = *state;
  zbar(foo);
  *state = foo->state;
}

You are calling it correctly in main (bar(&state);)

Note that the way it this code is now, once zbar is called, state will never change again. If you want a thread to access (and modify) state, you will need to store the address in struct foo:

struct foo
{
  // ...
  uint8_t* state;
};

And alter bar:

void bar(uint8_t* state) {
  struct foo_t *foo; //using malloc here - don't worry
  foo->state = state; // no dereferencing
  // zbar(foo);  // start the thread using zbar
}

void zbar(struct foo_t *arg) {
  if(condition)
    *(arg->state) = 1;
  else
    *(arg->state) = 0;
}

Then any changes to *(foo->state) will also change state in main

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I did edit my first poste, this was my bad. It was a typo. –  Joel Bodenmann Jun 7 '12 at 15:55
    
@Tectu - See my update –  Attila Jun 7 '12 at 16:02
    
Thanks, this helped. Everything works now as excpected :) –  Joel Bodenmann Jun 7 '12 at 16:04

No, this doesn't work. First of all, it won't compile -- foo_t's state member is defined to be a uint8_t but you are trying to store a uint8_t * in it. If you fix this by making bar say something like foo->state = *state, then it still won't work because although bar is being passed a pointer to main's state variable, all it does with it is to dereference it once and put the result in a struct.

You could declare foo_t to have a uint8_t * member, pass &state from main into bar and store that in the foo_t. Or (if the structure of your code permits it) forget about the foo_t altogether and just pass the pointer to state from main to bar to zbar. That is, one of these:

struct foo_t { ...; uint8_t * state; ... };
void bar(uint8_t * state) { struct foo_t * foo; ...; foo->state = state; zbar(foo); ... }
void zbar(struct foo_t * arg) { ...; *(arg->state) = 1; ... }

[EDITED to add: in this case you also need to declare state volatile in main, to warn the compiler that another thread might modify its value.]

or

void bar(uint8_t * state) { ...; zbar(state); ... }
void zbar(uint8_t * state) { ...; *state = 1; ... }

One other remark. "It's used within threads etc." is not a good justification for doing something strange or ugly. If there's a specific reason why the specific things you're doing with threads require it, of course that's another matter, and of course you're under no obligation to defend your design decisions here -- I just want to caution you against seeing "here be threads" as a general licence to do strange things.

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I changed the bar thing in my first post, it was a typo, it takes a uint8_t*. it needs to take be a struct, because there are also other members in there. But how can I access actual state's value, where i have the pointer from that in my struct? –  Joel Bodenmann Jun 7 '12 at 15:56
    
In the code you posted, you don't have a pointer in the struct, you have an actual uint8_t value in the struct. The first of the two options I mentioned puts a pointer in the struct and -- if I've understood you correctly -- achieves exactly what you're asking for ... except that I just realised that I didn't show what the code in main then needs to do. I'll edit my answer to make that clearer. –  Gareth McCaughan Jun 7 '12 at 16:02
    
Actually, no, the code in main looks just the same as it does now. Except that if state might be being changed in another thread, you'd better declare it volatile in main: volatile uint8_t state;. –  Gareth McCaughan Jun 7 '12 at 16:04
    
(I edited my code to match the edits in the OP, whose code still won't compile but now for a different reason.) –  Gareth McCaughan Jun 7 '12 at 16:06

I think what you're saying is:

  • thread 1 runs main, and has a local variable uint8_t state
    • it will check the value of this local variable in a loop, expecting it may be updated asynchronously by zbar
  • thread 2 runs (amongst other things) zbar
    • when zbar changes the value of arg->state, you want main to see the new value in thread 1

So, firstly, you need to make sure arg->state and main's local state variable actually refer to the same location in memory. Since bar already allocates foo_t arg, it might be easier to make that the shared copy:

int main(void) {
    foo_t *arg = bar();

    while(1) {
        if(arg->state)
            ; //do something here
    }
}

Secondly, you need to make sure that main actually sees the new value at that location: as infact says, there are a couple of things that might prevent this. Most obviously, there is no requirement for main to ever reload the value of state after the first call to bar, because it can't see anything that might change it.

This stuff is inherently non-portable; tell us the platform, and we'll be able to give more information.

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