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I have an array

Values array: 12 20 32 40 52
              ^  ^  ^  ^  ^
              0  1  2  3  4

on which I have to perform binary search to find the index of the range in which the number lies. For example:

  1. Given the number -> 19 (It lies between index 0 and 1), return 0
  2. Given the number -> 22 (It lies between index 1 and 2), return 1
  3. Given the number -> 40 (It lies between index 3 and 4), return 3

I implemented the binary search in the following manner, and this comes to be correct for case 1, and 3 but incorrect if we search for case 2 or 52, 55 32, etc.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int findIndex(int values[], int number, unsigned first, unsigned last)
{
    unsigned midPoint;
    while(first<last)
    {
        unsigned midPoint = (first+last)/2;
        if (number <= values[midPoint])
            last = midPoint -1;
        else if (number > values[midPoint])
            first = midPoint + 1;
    }
    return midPoint;
}


int main()
{
    int a[] = {12, 20, 32, 40, 52};
    unsigned i = findIndex(a, 55, 0, 4);
    cout << i;
}

Use of additional variables such as bool found is not allowed.

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2  
Why would it return 0 if it is between indices 1 and 2?! –  Visa is Racism Jun 7 '12 at 16:12
1  
That doesn't even compile. Try it in ideone (ideone.com) for instance. –  kbok Jun 7 '12 at 16:13
    
@Shahbaz: Editted. Thanks for pointing out –  user1372448 Jun 7 '12 at 16:13
1  
Why are first and last commented out? What is 0, 4 doing in the function declaration? –  Visa is Racism Jun 7 '12 at 16:14
2  
@Shahbaz and/or Ray Toal: Your edits make the function actually make sense, but since this is a question about why the OP's code does not work, we have no idea if what you've written is even what the OP is asking about. –  Benjamin Lindley Jun 7 '12 at 16:27
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A range in C or C++ is normally given as the pointing directly to the lower bound, but one past the upper bound. Unless you're feeling extremely masochistic, you probably want to stick to that convention in your search as well.

Assuming you're going to follow that, your last = midpoint-1; is incorrect. Rather, you want to set last to one past the end of the range you're going to actually use, so it should be last = midpoint;

You also only really need one comparison, not two. In a binary search as long as the two bounds aren't equal, you're going to set either the lower or the upper bound to the center point, so you only need to do one comparison to decide which.

At least by convention, in C++, you do all your comparisons using < instead of <=, >, etc. Any of the above can work, but following the convention of using only < keeps from imposing extra (unnecessary) requirements on contained types.

Though most interviewers probably don't care, there's also a potential overflow when you do midpoint = (left + right)/2;. I'd generally prefer midpoint = left + (right - left)/2;

Edit: Though I'm hesitant to post a direct solution to what's openly stated as an interview question, I'll hope I can trust you to be honest in how you use this:

template <class T>
T *lower_bound(T *left, T *right, T val) {
    while (left < right) {
        T *middle = left + (right - left) / 2;
        if (*middle < val)
            left = middle + 1;
        else
            right = middle;
    }
    return left;
}

template <class T>
T *upper_bound(T *left, T *right, T val) {
    while (left < right) {
        T *middle = left + (right - left) / 2;
        if (val < *middle)
            right = middle;
        else
            left = middle + 1;
    }
    return left;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Setting the 'last = midPoint' in the above post doesn't seem to giving the correct answer. –  user1372448 Jun 7 '12 at 16:31
    
@user1372448: the code I've added above has passed every test I've managed to come up with for it. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 7 '12 at 16:37
    
Your lower bound is actually the function for what you term as the masochistic way. Left is first, Right is last. Asking because I was still not getting correct, and was checking my code. –  user1372448 Jun 7 '12 at 16:43
    
@user1372448: no, lower_bound expects beginning/end+1 as the inputs, and maintains those throughout. It is slightly different from what you're asking for though. If a number is present, it returns the index of (the first occurrence of) that number. If the number is not present, it returns the index at which you'd insert it, where you want the index immediately before its insertion point. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 7 '12 at 16:56
    
@JerryCoffin: As per this question, 12-20 is one range, 20-32 is another ,32-40, 40-52, 52- and so on. I tried the lower_bound function as this pastebin.com/RJc3xRmw . I would have expected the values between [12, 20) to give index 0 whereas this gives index 0 only for 12 and not for values 13-19 because that is what it's set between which it lies –  user1372448 Jun 7 '12 at 17:33
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A regular binary search on success returns the index of the key. On failure to find the key it always stops at the index of the lowest key greater than the key we are searching. I guess following modified binary search algorithm will work.

Given sorted array A
Find a key using binary search and get an index. 
If A[index] == key
    return index;
else 
   while(index > 1 && A[index] == A[index -1]) index = index -1;
   return index;
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binsrch(array, num, low, high) {
if (num > array[high])
     return high;


while(1) {
     if (low == high-1)
          return low;
     if(low >= high)
          return low-1;        
     mid = (low+high)/2
     if (num < arr[mid])
          high = mid;
     else
          low = mid+1;
    }
}
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This will work under the condition that min(A[i]) <= key <=max(A[i])

int binary_search(int A[],int key,int left, int right)
{

  while (left <= right) {
        int middle = left + (right - left) / 2;
        if (A[middle] < key)
            left = middle+1;
        else if(A[middle] > key)
            right = middle-1;
        else
            return middle;
    }
    return (left - 1);
}
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Why not to use standard library functions?

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    for (int input = 10; input < 55; input++) {
        cout << input << ": ";

        // Your desire:
        vector<int> v = { 12, 20, 32, 40, 52 };
        if (input < v.front() || input > v.back()) {
            cout << "Not found" << endl;
        } else {
            auto it = upper_bound(v.begin(), v.end(), input);
            cout << it - v.begin() - 1 << endl;
        }
    }
}

Note: a pretty-cool site - http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm

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here is a more specific answer

int findIndex(int values[],int key,int first, int last)
{
    if(values[first]<=key && values[first+1]>=key)// stopping condition
    {
        return first;
    }

   int imid=first+(last-first)/2;

   if(first==last || imid==first)
   {
        return -1;
   }
   if(values[imid]>key)
   {
        return findIndex(values,key,first,imid);
    }
    else if(values[imid]<=key)
    {
        return findIndex(values,key,imid,last);
    }

}

I feel this is more inline to what you were looking for...and we won't crap out on the last value in this thing

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