Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I know there are tons of examples about removing punctuation but I want to know the most efficient way to do this. I have a list of words that I read from a txt file and split

wordlist = open('Tyger.txt', 'r').read().split()

What is the fastest way to check each word and remove any punctuation? I can do it with a bunch of code but I know it is not the easiest way.

Thanks!!

share|improve this question
    
Can you provide a sample input and output (or delineate what makes up your set of punctuation)? – Levon Jun 7 '12 at 16:14
    
sure no problem. The text file is a poem. the first two lines read:Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, I would like them to end up in the list with not commas or exclamation marks. The set of puntuation I need removed is "-,!?. Thanks! – English Grad Jun 7 '12 at 16:15
    
looks like a duplicate to this stackoverflow.com/questions/265960/… – Joran Beasley Jun 7 '12 at 16:16
    
@JoranBeasley: I don't think this is a dup. My answer fits this question, but not the other one. – Sven Marnach Jun 7 '12 at 16:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the easiest way is to only extract words consisting of letters in the first place:

import re

with open("Tyger.txt") as f:
    words = re.findall("\w+", f.read())
share|improve this answer
    
how would this deal with special chars which are not punctuation? – luke14free Jun 7 '12 at 16:21
    
This works great thanks. I really appreciate the help. I learn so much from all of you guys – English Grad Jun 7 '12 at 16:21
1  
@EnglishGrad: Note Sven's use of the with keyword to open the input file. Using a with block is preferred to using f = open()... close() and much preferred to using stuff = open().read().... In the last example you lose the ability to explicitly close() the file after reading/writing. – Joel Cornett Jun 7 '12 at 16:28
    
@luke14free: By providing the re.LOCALE or re.UNICODE flags and set the locale, you can make this perform as desired. For standard strings without any flags, it would only match the set [a-zA-Z0-9_]. See the documentation for further details. – Sven Marnach Jun 7 '12 at 16:41

I would go with something like this:

import re
with open("Tyger.txt") as f:
    print " ".join(re.split("[\-\,\!\?\.]", f.read())

It will remove only what is really needed and wont create excessive overload due to overmatching.

share|improve this answer

For example:

text = """
Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry? 
"""
import re
words = re.findall(r'\w+', text)

or

import string
ps = string.punctuation
words = text.translate(string.maketrans(ps, ' ' * len(ps))).split()

The second one is much faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that your two solutions do different things. "fearful,symmetry" will end up being a single word with the second approach. – Sven Marnach Jun 7 '12 at 16:20
1  
@SvenMarnach: yes, correct. Still, translate is 4x times faster than re. – georg Jun 7 '12 at 16:29
>>> import re

>>> the_tyger
'\n    Tyger! Tyger! burning bright \n    In the forests of the night, \n    What immortal hand or eye \n    Could frame thy fearful symmetry? \n    \n    In what distant deeps or skies \n    Burnt the fire of thine eyes? \n    On what wings dare he aspire? \n    What the hand dare sieze the fire? \n    \n    And what shoulder, & what art. \n    Could twist the sinews of thy heart? \n    And when thy heart began to beat, \n    What dread hand? & what dread feet? \n    \n    What the hammer? what the chain? \n    In what furnace was thy brain? \n    What the anvil? what dread grasp \n    Dare its deadly terrors clasp? \n    \n    When the stars threw down their spears, \n    And watered heaven with their tears, \n    Did he smile his work to see? \n    Did he who made the Lamb make thee? \n    \n    Tyger! Tyger! burning bright \n    In the forests of the night, \n    What immortal hand or eye \n    Dare frame thy fearful symmetry? \n    '

>>> print re.sub(r'["-,!?.]','',the_tyger)

Prints:

Tyger Tyger burning bright 
In the forests of the night 
What immortal hand or eye 
Could frame thy fearful symmetry 

In what distant deeps or skies 
Burnt the fire of thine eyes 
On what wings dare he aspire 
What the hand dare sieze the fire 

And what shoulder  what art 
Could twist the sinews of thy heart 
And when thy heart began to beat 
What dread hand  what dread feet 

What the hammer what the chain 
In what furnace was thy brain 
What the anvil what dread grasp 
Dare its deadly terrors clasp 

When the stars threw down their spears 
And watered heaven with their tears 
Did he smile his work to see 
Did he who made the Lamb make thee 

Tyger Tyger burning bright 
In the forests of the night 
What immortal hand or eye 
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry 

Or, with a file:

>>> with open('tyger.txt', 'r') as WmBlake:
...    print re.sub(r'["-,!?.]','',WmBlake.read())

And if you want to create a list of the lines:

>>> lines=[]
>>> with open('tyger.txt', 'r') as WmBlake:
...    lines.append(re.sub(r'["-,!?.]','',WmBlake.read()))
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for posting the complete poem ;) Although it looks more like Bukowski now than Blake. – georg Jun 7 '12 at 16:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.