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It's allowed to embed SVG in HTML...

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <title>Hmmm....</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1" x="0" y="0" width="500px" height="100%">
            <text>Hello cruel world!</text>
        </svg>
    </body>
</html>

...and vice versa:

<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1" x="0" y="0" width="500px" height="100%">
    <foreignObject x="0" y="0" width="100%" height="100%">
        <body xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
            <h1>Goodbye cruel world...</h1>
        </body>
    </foreignObject>
</svg>

The specs say (23.2, third paragraph) (and I quote:) "If you want to embed SVG in XHTML in SVG in XHTML in SVG, it's okay...". I thought Wow, that's DEEP! and did this:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <title>Yeah!</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1" x="0" y="0" width="500px" height="100%">
            <foreignObject x="0" y="0" width="100%" height="100%">
                <body class="svgbody" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
                    <h1>And hello again!</h1>
                </body>
            </foreignObject>
        </svg>
    </body>
</html>

But all browsers merge the body tag with the HTML5 body tag (the HTML5 body tag gets the svgbody class)... This is the fiddle (fullscreen); there's no body tag within the inline svg.

I don't know why, and I hope you can help me out! It might be solved by putting the SVG in a different file, but I don't want to hear about it. Why doesn't it work?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One thing to bear in mind is that the SVG document is discussing XHTML in SVG in an XML document. You are not using XML but HTML. It's a feature of the HTML parser that merges body tags in the way you see.

If you were using an XML parser, that merging wouldn't happen. To achieve this, you'd need to serve the document with an application/xhtml+xml content type. If you did that, you'd then need to fix other issues like adding a xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" attribute to your html element.

It's much easier to follow robertc's advice.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, I did some further reading and I found the XML namespace doesn't do anything. But is it valid to put a div tag right into the foreignObject? That would solve everything... –  bopjesvla Jun 7 '12 at 19:25
    
<div> as the direct child of <foreignObject> is fine. The validator doesn't seem happy with <foreignObject> as the direct child of <svg> though. You may need to adjust that. –  Alohci Jun 7 '12 at 20:19
    
"It's a feature of the HTML parser that merges body tags in the way you see." Well that's interesting. –  JAB Jun 8 '12 at 15:45
    
@JAB - If you want the gory details they're here: dev.w3.org/html5/spec/…. Search down for A start tag whose tag name is "body" and then the last paragraph in that section. FWIW, html tags are treated in a similar way. –  Alohci Jun 8 '12 at 15:49
    
Hm, it seems kind of odd that using an html tag in such a way doesn't result in the frameset-ok flag being set to "not ok" but body tags do. What is the frameset-ok flag used for? The description of it there isn't very useful. –  JAB Jun 8 '12 at 16:00

Do you need the body element for something in particular? Why not just wrap your content with a non-privileged element:

<body>
    <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1" x="0" y="0" width="100%" height="100%">
        <foreignObject x="0" y="0" width="100%" height="100%">
            <body xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
                <div class="svgbody">
                    <h1>This sucks less</h1>
                </div>
            </body>
        </foreignObject>
    </svg>
</body>
share|improve this answer
    
Or even just omit the body tags inside the foreignObject altogether. They're not doing anything useful. –  Alohci Jun 7 '12 at 18:12

If you want the html5 parser to ignore the svg and everything inside it () you could just put the svg into an comment; to let the svg parser ignore the html-note use cdata:

<html><body><svg>
<![CDATA[  <!--  ]]>
    <ForeingObject />
<![CDATA[   -->  ]]>
</svg></body></html>

http://www.w3schools.com/xml/xml_cdata.asp

try something like this...

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In HTML in SVG in HTML, I found the following example code. It works fine for me.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
  <title>HTML in SVG in HTML</title>
  <style type='text/css'>
    svg { border: 1px solid black; }
    svg div { border: 1px dotted blue; }
  </style>
</head>
<body>
<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" width="800" height="500">
  <foreignObject class="node" x="46" y="22" width="200" height="300">
    <body xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
      <div>The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. Pack my box with
         five dozen liquor jugs</div>
    </body>
  </foreignObject>
</svg>
</body>
</html>

Still, note that support for inline SVG in HTML documents remains "quirky" at best, even today (March 2014). For example, try this Codepen in different browsers.

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