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I totally new to C++ so bear with me. I want to make a class with a static array, and access to this array from the main. Here is what i want to do in C#.

   namespace ConsoleApplication1
    {
        class Program
        {
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                Class a = new Class();
                Console.WriteLine(a.arr[1]);

            }
        }
    }

    =====================

    namespace ConsoleApplication1
    {
        class Class
        {       
            public static string[] s_strHands = new string[]{"one","two","three"};
        }
    }

Here is what i have tried:

// justfoolin.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Class {

  public:
      static string arr[3] = {"one", "two", "three"};
};


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Class x;
    cout << x.arr[2] << endl;
    return 0;
}

But i got: IntelliSense: data member initializer is not allowed

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No me gusta using namespace std; –  Cole Johnson Dec 24 '12 at 5:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You need to perform the initialization later; you cannot initialize class members within the class definition. (If you could, then classes defined in header files would cause each translation unit to define their own copy of the member, leaving the linker with a mess to sort out.)

class Class {
  public:
      static string arr[];
};

string Class::arr[3] = {"one", "two", "three"};

The class definition defines the interface, which is separate from the implementation.

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Static data members that have integer type may be initialized inline in C++03, though they must still be defined if they are to be used as an object. Most (all?) data members may be initialized inline in C++11, though Visual C++ does not yet support this feature. –  James McNellis Jun 7 '12 at 16:45
    
I don't think C++11 changes anything with respect to static data members, only instance data members. When a constructor is compiled, any previously initialized instance members that the compiler has seen get implicitly initialized in the constructor with the seen default. There is no magic that could make this work for static members; a symbol must be emitted in some translation unit. –  cdhowie Jun 7 '12 at 16:50
    
You are correct. My second sentence should have started "most nonstatic data members." Apologies for the confusion. –  James McNellis Jun 7 '12 at 17:02
    
thanks i didnt know this. One more thing: now i got a warning C4101: 'x' : unreferenced local variable. Although x is used in cout << x.arr[2] << endl; Its not a big deal im just wondering whyit is so. –  user1435915 Jun 7 '12 at 17:15
    
Because you are accessing a static member of Class: if you write cout << Class::arr << endl you will see the same output. Accessing a static class member through an instance does not count as using the instance. –  cdhowie Jun 7 '12 at 17:18

You must initialize static members outside your class, as if it would be a global variable, like this:

class Class { 

  public: 
      static string arr[3];
}; 

string Class::arr = {"one", "two", "three"}; 
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just to add only static const integral data members can be initialized within a class. –  Krishna_Oza Mar 20 '14 at 6:01

Only static, integer-type data members may be initialized in the class definition. Your static data member is of type string, so it cannot be initialized inline.

You must define arr outside of the class definition, and initialize it there. You should remove the initializer from the declaration and the following after your class:

string Class::arr[3] = {"one", "two", "three"};

If your class is defined in a header file, its static data members should be defined in exactly one source (.cpp) file.

Also note that not all errors that appear in the Error List in Visual Studio are build errors. Notably, errors that begin with "IntelliSense:" are errors that IntelliSense has detected. IntelliSense and the compiler do not always agree.

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only static const integral data not static integer-type data members. –  Krishna_Oza Mar 20 '14 at 6:03

You have to initialize your static member outside of the class declaration:

string Class::arr[3] = {"one", "two", "three"};
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