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Here is the HTML:

<div>
    <h3>text</h3>
</div>
<div>
    <h3>moretext</h3>
</div>
<div>
    <h3>123</h3>
</div>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

Here is the JS:

var rv1_wlength = $("div").filter(function() {
    return $(this).find("h3").filter(function () {
        return $(this).text() != "123";
    }).length;
});

var rv1_wolength = $("div").filter(function() {
    return $(this).find("h3").filter(function () {
        return $(this).text() != "123";
    });
});

var rv2 = $("div").find("h3").filter(function() {
    return $(this).text() != "123";
});

alert(rv1_wlength.text());   // text
                             // moretext

alert(rv1_wolength.text());  // text
                             // moretext
                             // 123

alert(rv2.text());​           // textmoretext

I don't understand why the first two methods print the elements on each line, whereas the second method concatenates them. rv2 is a jQuery object. Then, what are the first two (rv1_wlength and rv1_wolength)?

Furthermore, I don't understand why the inclusion of the length property makes all the difference in filtering the elements. The second method does nothing, since it returns all the elements. The first method, with the only change being the addition of the length property, correctly filters the elements. I would very much like a line-by-line explanation.

I would sincerely appreciate any feedback. Thank you.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code gets all div elements containing at least one h3 whose text is not "123".

var rv1_wlength = $("div").filter(function() {
    return $(this).find("h3").filter(function () {
        return $(this).text() != "123";
    }).length;
});

This code is useless:

var rv1_wolength = $("div").filter(function() {
    return $(this).find("h3").filter(function () {
        return $(this).text() != "123";
    });
});

That will return the original selection, $('div'), since the callback function always returns a truthy value (an empty jQuery set is still considered truthy).


Finally, this code gets all h3 elements whose text is not "123":

var rv2 = $("div").find("h3").filter(function() {
    return $(this).text() != "123";
});

When you call .text(), jquery concatenates the text of all the elements in the selection. In the first case, this is concatenating the text inside the divs, which contains line breaks. In the second, it is concatenating the text in the h3s which do not.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your help. The second one returns all elements, because the line that starts with 'return $(this).find("h3")...' will always return true. But why does the incluson of the length property make all the difference? –  user717236 Jun 7 '12 at 16:51
1  
Even when $(this).find("h3") is empty, it is still considered true. However, $(this).find("h3").length will be 0, and 0 is considered false. –  Eric Jun 7 '12 at 16:52
    
Thank you. Right, that makes sense. But if you're returning 0 or 1 (or false or true) to '$("div").filter...', how does the filter know to only select those elements? I'm getting confused because I'm thinking if you're returning a boolean value, it'll forget about the elements because you're not explicitly returning those. Does that make sense, why I'm getting confused, that is? –  user717236 Jun 7 '12 at 16:58
1  
$(...).filter takes a function that returns true for elements to keep, and false for elements to discard. It happens that the statement x == true is true for more values of x than you might think. –  Eric Jun 7 '12 at 17:00
    
OK, I think helps me understand. Thank you very much for your help. –  user717236 Jun 7 '12 at 17:05

There are text nodes with newlines outside the <h3> elements but inside the <div> elements. The newlines cause line breaks in the dialog put up by alert(). When you just get the <h3> contents, there are no newlines.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, the first two are including newlines in the text node. That makes sense. Thank you for your help. –  user717236 Jun 7 '12 at 16:47

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