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I have written the code to check whether the given string is palindrome or not. But here I didn't create any String object explicitly. When we don't create explicitly, "==" also should work to compare the strings. But here I am not getting correct output if I use ==. For the clarity in my question, I have given another code also below

Code 1:Here. "==" is not working.

class Palindrome 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {

        StringBuffer sb1=new StringBuffer();
        sb1.append("anna");
        String s1=sb1.toString();
        StringBuffer sb2=new StringBuffer();
        sb2=sb1.reverse();
        String s2=sb2.toString();
        if(s1.equals(s2))
        {
            System.out.println("The given String is a Palindrome");
        }
        else

            System.out.println("Not a Palindrome");

    }
}

Code 2: Here == works

class Stringdemo 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        String str1="hello";
        String str2="hello";
        if(str1==str2)
        {
            System.out.println("both strings are same");
        }
        else
        {
            System.out.println("both strings are not Same");
        }
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

Using StringBuilder/Buffer.toString() will create a new instance hence why equals() works, but == doesn't. In the case of using string literals, any string that is a string literal will be added to the constants pool of the class, and hence string1 and string2 will merely point to that same reference within the constant pool for "hello", ergo == says true because they are the same reference.

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"==" compares object reference values where "equals()" compares object contents. "==" is only really useful for comparing primitives.

When you call "sb2.toString()" it creates a new object which has a new reference value.

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sb2.toString(); creates a new String. == won't work here

it will however work if you use sb2.toString().intern() instead

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The below code fails using the intern also ~ String a="abc"; String c="abc"; String b=new String (a); String d=new String (a); b.intern(); d.intern(); if(a==c){ System.out.println("one is true"); } if(b==d){ System.out.println("4 is true"); } ~ The out put is ~one is true~ –  abhi Jun 8 '13 at 17:40
1  
@abhi you need to use the return value of d.intern(). d.intern() does not change the value of d, but returns a new String. And it works: ideone.com/pJodCl –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jun 9 '13 at 13:56
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== checks for object identity equality (i.e., same memory address).

.equals() checks for for equality of the value.

When you create a new string literal:

 String str1="hello";
 String str2="hello";

Java calls the String.intern() method to intern the new String, but will first check to see if that same String value already exists, and if it does it will return that (i.e., will not create a new instance). See the Javadoc comments on String.intern() for more details:

When the intern method is invoked, if the pool already contains a string equal to this String object as determined by the equals(Object) method, then the string from the pool is returned. Otherwise, this String object is added to the pool and a reference to this String object is returned.

This is why the second example works, but the StringBuilder example does not since calling sb2.toString creates a new instance, bypassing intern().

To be safe, you are better off using .equals() for any non-primative objects.

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Thank you so much Paul for your valuable info. –  Kanth Jun 8 '12 at 16:40
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== operator just checks the object's reference, while equals() compares the strings for its characters seperately.

Since String are immutable objects therefore it shares the reference of objects if it is created already in memory.

Therefore,

String str1 = "hello"; //and
String str2 = "hello"; //are equal

Because both str1 and str2 shares the same reference of "hello".

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String is immutable object. Right? How come you said mutable. Can you clarify my doubt? –  Kanth Jun 7 '12 at 16:56
    
that was my spelling mistake in try to typing fast..i said sorry for that.. :) –  Asif Jun 7 '12 at 16:57
    
Not a problem at all. Actually I got a doubt because of that, as I am still learning java –  Kanth Jun 8 '12 at 16:44
    
still learning :) even programmers with years of experience will say the same because java is so adult now and is keeps on growing.. :) Keep learning.. :) –  Asif Jun 8 '12 at 16:47
    
Your name looks like you are Indian. Aren't you? Okay Anyways. Thanks. :) –  Kanth Jun 9 '12 at 15:26
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