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What is the best way to have js return undefined rather than throw an error when a parent property does not exist?

Example

a = {}
b = a.x.y.z
// Error: Cannot read property 'value' of undefined
// Target result: b = undefined
share|improve this question
    
If you don't want to fill your code with a lot of try/catch (that is somehow a solution), in JS usually you check if an object is defined before using a specific property / method of it. It means, in that case, that you should verify that a has x, before access to it, and so on. If you using that approach to simulate namespaces, you can create your own function that do this operation recursively for you. –  ZER0 Jun 7 '12 at 17:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to check for the existence of each property:

var b;
if (a.x && a.x.y && a.x.y.z) {
    b = a.x.y.z
}

Or, simliar to another poster's "safeGet" function:

var get = function (obj, ns) {
    var y = ns.split('.');
    for(var i = 0; i < y.length; i += 1) {
        if (obj[y[i]]) {
            obj = obj[y[i]];
        } else {
            return;
        }
    }
    return obj;
};

Use:

var b = get(a, 'x.y.z');
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I normally do this except that there are a large number of properties (out of my control, it gets the data structure from elsewhere) and wanted a shorter/cleaner way to do it –  arcyqwerty Jun 7 '12 at 17:15
    
What do you think of my other suggestion? –  btford Jun 7 '12 at 17:24
    
does it work with array keys also? say, x.y[0].z? –  arcyqwerty Jun 7 '12 at 17:29
2  
Yes; it's kind of a hack, but you'd call it as: get(someVar, 'x.y.0.z'). –  btford Jun 7 '12 at 17:39
    
awesome, thanks. –  arcyqwerty Jun 7 '12 at 17:42
try {
  a = {}
  b = a.x.y.z
}
catch (e) {
  b = void 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can we do this while still throwing other errors? –  arcyqwerty Jun 7 '12 at 17:09
    
@arcyqwerty I guess you could do if ( e instanceof TypeError ) –  Esailija Jun 7 '12 at 17:11
    
yeah. suppose it works pretty well. adding a throw e to it if false –  arcyqwerty Jun 7 '12 at 17:19

I would go for slightly verbose:

var b = ((a.x || {}).y || {}).z
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you could write a safeGet helper function, something like:

edited for drilldown as suggested in comments by arcyqwerty

var getter = function (collection, key) {
    if (collection.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
        return collection[key];
    } else {
        return undefined;
    }
};

var drillDown = function (keys, currentIndex, collection) {
    var max = keys.length - 1;
    var key = keys[currentIndex];

    if (typeof collection === 'undefined') {
        return undefined;   
    }

    if (currentIndex === max) {
        return getter(collection, key);
    } else {
        return drillDown(keys, currentIndex + 1,
                         getter(collection, key));
    }
};

var safeGet = function (collection, key) {
    if (key.indexOf(".") !== -1) {
        return drillDown(key.split("."), 0, collection);
    } else {
        return getter(collection, key);
    }
};

a = { x: 1 };
b = safeGet(a, 'x.y.z');

http://jsfiddle.net/YqdWH/2/

share|improve this answer
    
Needs to work for many nested keys, multiple calls to safeget would probably be a bit long –  arcyqwerty Jun 7 '12 at 17:18
1  
@arcyqwerty that can be easily taken care of by parsing the key into parts separated by . and recursively calling safeGet –  jbabey Jun 7 '12 at 17:24
    
@arcyqwerty i have updated my answer. –  jbabey Jun 7 '12 at 17:46

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