Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to compute the eye-space width of a pixel's projected pyramid at the current vertex location in a glsl vertex shader, but I can't seem to get the math right. Here is an obviously incorrect example:

// GLSL VERTEX SHADER
#version 410 compatibility

uniform vec4 viewport; // same as glViewport​
in vec4 gl_Vertex;

void main ()
{
    gl_Position = gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * gl_Vertex;
    float pixelWidth = gl_Position.z / viewport.z;
<snip>

But this does not account for the FOV or clipping planes.

share|improve this question

In a vertex shader there is no such thing as a world-space width of a pixel. "Width" is projected into a pixel only at the given Z-distance. In general you have a pyramid projected into a pixel.

Here you go:

  1. Convert two screen-points into NDC points:

        vec2 Screen = vec2( ScreenWidth, ScreenHeight );
        vec3 Point1 = vec3( ScreenPt1 / Screen * 2.0 - vec2( 1.0 ), 1.0 );
        vec3 Point2 = vec3( ScreenPt2 / Screen * 2.0 - vec2( 1.0 ), 1.0 );
    
  2. Unproject NDC points into world-space positions:

        vec4 R1 = vec4( Point1, 1.0 );
        vec4 R2 = vec4( Point2, 1.0 );
    
        R1 = Projection.GetInversed() * R1;
        R1 = ModelView.GetInversed() * R1;
        R1 /= R1.W;
    
        R2 = Projection.GetInversed() * R2;
        R2 = ModelView.GetInversed() * R2;
        R2 /= R2.W;
    
  3. Find the distance between R1 and R2.

In a fragment shader you can use local derivatives. Take a look here:

http://www.opengl.org/sdk/docs/manglsl/xhtml/dFdx.xml

and here:

http://www.opengl.org/sdk/docs/manglsl/xhtml/fwidth.xml

Available only in the fragment shader, dFdx and dFdy return the partial derivative of expression p in x and y, respectively. Deviatives are calculated using local differencing. Expressions that imply higher order derivatives such as dFdx(dFdx(n)) have undefined results, as do mixed-order derivatives such as dFdx(dFdy(n)). It is assumed that the expression p is continuous and therefore, expressions evaluated via non-uniform control flow may be undefined.

share|improve this answer
1  
These functions are available only in the fragment shader and I am asking about the vertex shader, so this doesn't help me. – atb Jun 7 '12 at 18:35
1  
See my updated answer. – Sergey K. Jun 7 '12 at 18:41
    
OK, using your semantics I need the world-space width of the "pixel pyramid" at the z-depth of the current vertex in the vertex shader. Your answer still doesn't help me, but thanks for the info. – atb Jun 7 '12 at 18:45
    
Added some code to do it. – Sergey K. Jun 7 '12 at 18:52
    
But I only have one point, and your example code does not account for viewport resolution... – atb Jun 7 '12 at 18:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I worked through the math and figured it out. :) As I had hoped there are no additional matrix transformations required, just one divide:

// GLSL VERTEX SHADER
#version 410 compatibility

uniform vec4 viewport; // same as glViewport​
in vec4 gl_Vertex;

float pixelWidthRatio = 2. / (viewport.z * gl_ProjectionMatrix[0][0]);

void main ()
{
    gl_Position = gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * gl_Vertex;
    float pixelWidth = gl_Position.w * pixelWidthRatio;
    <snip>

Or alternatively:

<snip>
float pixelHeightRatio = 2. / (viewport.w * gl_ProjectionMatrix[1][1]);

void main ()
{
    gl_Position = gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * gl_Vertex;
    float pixelHeight = gl_Position.w * pixelHeightRatio;
<snip>

As expected, pixelWidth and pixelHeight are the same if the pixels are square.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.