Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I create a dictionary from a remote database as part of my application run. This process is pretty I/O heavy, so I've decided to create a "singleton" instance of this dictionary and just call it as it is needed in my application.

The code looks like (in Dictionaries.py):

state_code_dict = None

def get_state_code_dict():
    global state_code_dict
    if state_code_dict == None:
        state_code_dict = generate_state_code_dict()
    return state_code_dict

I then import and call the get_state_code_dict() function where needed. I added a print statement to check if state_code_dict was being reinitialized or reused, and I found it was being reused (which is the functionality I want). Why is the instance of state_code_dict surviving the application run?

Edit

I import the get_state_code_dict function in multiple files.

share|improve this question
    
because imported code gets executed only the first time? –  KurzedMetal Jun 7 '12 at 17:29
    
edited to clarify: I import the code in multiple locations (multiple files include the get_state_code_dict function. –  Tyler DeWitt Jun 7 '12 at 17:32
1  
Importing code that the interpreter has already loaded will not re-load that code by default. It's possible to deliberately reload a module but if you have to do this for any reason other than because the actual code of the module might have changed during runtime, you should probably use a different programming idiom to do what you want to do. –  Andrew Gorcester Jun 7 '12 at 17:35
    
And this behavior is desirable precisely because module initialization is sometimes heavyweight. –  Russell Borogove Jun 7 '12 at 17:40
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is the Python Language Reference's description of how importing a module works:

(1) find a module, and initialize it if necessary; (2) define a name or names in the local namespace

(Emphasis added.) Here, initializing a module means executing its code. This execution is only performed if necessary, i.e. if the module was not previously imported in the current process. Since Python modules are first-class runtime objects, they effectively become singletons, initialized at the time of first import.

Note that this means that there's no need for a get_state_dict_code function; just initialize state_code_dict at top-level:

state_code_dict = generate_state_code_dict()

For a more in-depth explanation, see this talk by Thomas Wouters, esp. the first part where he discusses the "everything is runtime" principle.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the simplified module-as-singleton idiom. –  Russell Borogove Jun 7 '12 at 17:37
    
Would I then get the state_code_dict by calling import Dictionaries; state_code_dict = Dictionaries.state_code_dict? –  Tyler DeWitt Jun 7 '12 at 17:57
    
@TylerDeWitt: yes. Or by the idiomatic from Dictionaries import state_code_dict. –  larsmans Jun 7 '12 at 18:00
add comment

I voted larsmans answer, i just wanted to add an example.

hello.py:

hi = 'hello'

print(hi)

def print_hi():
    print(hi)

ipython session:

In [1]: from hello import print_hi
hello

In [2]: print_hi()
hello

In [3]: from hello import print_hi

In [4]: import hello

In [5]: hello.print_hi()
hello


Look that the imports at lines 3 and 4 don't output "hello" as the import in line 1 did, that means the code isn't re-executed.

share|improve this answer
add comment

That's how it works in every language I can think of. Java, C#, C++, C, Python, etc.

If you got a separate instance of globals each time you imported a module, you would have to find some different way to share global state.

If you don't want global state, then you should create a class instead of using global variables.

share|improve this answer
2  
It would be nice if when folks find an answer incorrect, they explain why, so I can be enlightened. –  Dietrich Epp Jun 7 '12 at 17:38
1  
There are a lot of features of Python that work differently from other languages, so bringing that up isn't helpful at all. Not my downvote by the way, I prefer communication to punishment. –  Mark Ransom Jun 7 '12 at 17:41
2  
I didn't downvote you, but in C/C++, #include, unlike Python's import, is not idempotent - it does an unconditional, literal text insertion, which doesn't map well onto the concept of imports in other languages. –  Russell Borogove Jun 7 '12 at 17:43
    
But most features in Python are the same as other languages. The concept of global variables, integers, classes, functions, local variables, etc... –  Dietrich Epp Jun 7 '12 at 17:43
    
@RussellBorogove: #include isn't idempotent, but multiple declarations of global variables are idempotent and always resolve to the same global variable. –  Dietrich Epp Jun 7 '12 at 17:45
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.