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I have the following code snippet

Class Parent
{
    public override String ToString()
    {
            return "in Parent";
    }

    public virtual void printer()
    {
           Console.write(this.ToString());
    }
}

Class Child : Parent
{
    public override String ToString()
    {
            return "in Derived";
    }

    public override void printer()
    { 
           base.printer();
           Console.write(this.ToString());
    }
}

in Main I have

Parent p = new Derived();
p.printer();

The output comes as "In Derived" 2 times. This is expected as most overridden method is called.

But, is it possible to call the ToString() method of the base class, in this case instead of the base calling the derived one?

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Welcome to the fun of virtual methods. –  Powerlord Jun 7 '12 at 18:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No. Form MSDN:

When a virtual method is invoked, the run-time type of the object is checked for an overriding member. The overriding member in the most derived class is called, which might be the original member, if no derived class has overridden the member.

So even if you cast to Parent, the object is still a Child so that override will apply. The problem is that you're calling ToString() from the parent class which has been overridden, so there's no way to get to it if the instance is a Child.

One way to get around it is to create a separate private function instead of using ToString():

public class Parent
{
    public override String ToString()
    {
        return ToStringPrivate();
    }

    private string ToStringPrivate()
    {
        return "in Parent";
    }

    public virtual void printer()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(this.ToStringPrivate());
    }
}

public class Child : Parent
{
    public override String ToString()
    {
        return "in Derived";
    }

    public override void printer()
    {
        base.printer();
        Console.WriteLine(this.ToString());
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can get around this by using the new keyword, rather than overriding ToString() in your Child class.

Then, when your object is referenced as a Child (or a child of Child), ToString() will map to Child.ToString(). When it is cast as a base object (such as Parent), ToString() will map to Parent.ToString().

I don't think this is necessarilly good practice though, especially with the ToString() function.

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You'll have to add a new method in Child:

public override string BaseToString()
{
     return base.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer

I think you've touched on the solution in your original question code. You just need to call base.ToString() directly. Your base.printer() call is still calling this.ToString() which is going to call the overridden version from the Child class.

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