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I have an array containing strings with special unicode characters:

var a = [
    ["a", 33],  
    ["h\u016B", 44],
    ["s\u00EF", 51],
    ...
];

When I loop over this array:

for (i=0;i<a.length;i++) {
    document.write(a[i][0] + "<br />");
}

It prints characters with accents:

a
hù
sô
...

and I want:

a
h\u016B
s\u00EF
...

How can I achieve this in Javascript?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Something like this?

/* Creates a uppercase hex number with at least length digits from a given number */
function fixedHex(number, length){
    var str = number.toString(16).toUpperCase();
    while(str.length < length)
        str = "0" + str;
    return str;
}

/* Creates a unicode literal based on the string */    
function unicodeLiteral(str){
    var i;
    var result = "";
    for( i = 0; i < str.length; ++i){
        /* You should probably replace this by an isASCII test */
        if(str.charCodeAt(i) > 126 || str.charCodeAt(i) < 32)
            result += "\\u" + fixedHex(str.charCodeAt(i),4);
        else
            result += str[i];
    }

    return result;
}

var a = [
    ["a", 33],  
    ["h\u016B", 44],
    ["s\u00EF", 51]
];

var i;
for (i=0;i<a.length;i++) {
    document.write(unicodeLiteral(a[i][0]) + "<br />");
}

Result

a
h\u016B
s\u00EF

JSFiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Good solution but I think it should be if(str.charCodeAt(i) > 127) (ASCII stops at 0x7F). –  dda Jun 8 '12 at 5:10
    
@dda: Doh, indeed. However 0x7F is DEL, so 0x7E should be a better upper bound. Edited my answer, thanks for the remark :). –  Zeta Jun 8 '12 at 6:07

if you have a unicode char and you want it as a string you can do this

x = "h\u016B";
// here the unicode is the second char
uniChar = x.charCodeAt(1).toString(16); // 16b
uniChar = uniChar.toUpperCase(); // it is now 16B
uniChar = "\\u0" + uniChar; // it is now \\u016B
x = x.charAt(0) + uniChar; // x = "h\\u016B" which prints as you wish
share|improve this answer

javascript's string.charCodeAt() should help. I.e.

"test".charCodeAt(0) will return the numeric code for "t".

Beyond that, you'd need to write an if statement to check if the character is non-ASCII, etc.

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1  
You have a typo, it's charCodeAt –  Larry K Jun 7 '12 at 18:11

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