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my code is as follows:-

#include<stdio.h>

main() {
    union a {
        short int x;
        char y[2];
    };
    union a e;
    e.y[0] = 3;
    e.y[1] = 2;
    printf("%d\n%d\n%d\n", e.y[0], e.y[1], e.x);

    return 0;
}

It gives output as

3
2
515

i didn't understand that how this 515 comes?

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since I wanted an excuse for ASCII art...

Declaring the union lets you choose how to interpret its data. In your case, either as an unsigned short or a char [2]. Both of these are 2 bytes long, so your union will refer to a 2-byte section of memory, thusly:

union a e;

    ---------------
e-> | ???? | ???? |
    ---------------

Now you decide to interpret your union as a character array:

e.y[0] = 3;

    ---------------
e-> | 0x03 | ???? |
    ---------------

e.y[1] = 2;

    ---------------
e-> | 0x03 | 0x02 |
    ---------------

Then you interpret it as an unsigned short:

printf("%d\n%d\n%d\n", e.y[0], e.y[1], e.x);

You're on a little-endian system (as @Oli noted), meaning the least-significant byte is stored first in memory. Which means that when your code looks at an unsigned short, it thinks 0x03 is the least-significant byte.

So your 2-byte unsigned short is interpreted as 0x0203. And 0x0203 hex is 515 decimal.


That comment was interesting enough to put in the answer for clarity, I think.

Let's say we do this:

union a {
    int x;
    char y[2];
};

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    union a e = {512};
}

What's inside? Break it down:

int is 4 bytes, char [2] is 2 bytes, so the union is 4 bytes long to store the largest datatype. 512 is 0x00000200 in hex. So store that integer little-endian and you have:

    -----------------------------
e-> | 0x00 | 0x02 | 0x00 | 0x00 |
    -----------------------------

So e.x is 512. e.y[0] is 0 and e.y[1] is 2

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then, if union have union a { int x, char y[2] }; union a e = {512}; then what is the value of all members? –  devnull Jun 7 '12 at 19:10
    
Is this a test? ;) I'll bite. int is 4 bytes, and 512 is 0x00000200 as an integer. So store that integer little-endian and you have [00][02][00][00] in memory. So e.x is 512. e.y[0] is 0 and y[1] is 2. What do I win? –  JoeFish Jun 7 '12 at 19:26
    
thanks alot to clear all of my doubts in union concept. –  devnull Jun 7 '12 at 19:29
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The 515 is hex 0x0203.

e.y[0] is 3, or 0x03. e.y[1] is 2, or 0x02.

The short int x combines the two into 0x0203, or 515.

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You have a little-endian system:

2 * 28 + 3 = 515.

The union is effectively allowing you to reinterpret the memory used by the short as a pair of consecutive chars.

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can you please explain the expression that you wrote ? –  devnull Jun 7 '12 at 18:37
    
@HiteshJhamb: A short is 2 bytes on your platform. A byte is 8 bits. Therefore the upper byte is worth 2^8 = 256 times as much as the lower byte. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 7 '12 at 18:40
    
As union creates space of maximum sized member space that is 2 bytes. So when we put 3 and 2 in y[0], y[1] respectively then 3 stores in first byte as 00000011 and in second byte it stores as 00000010 then how you relate this with your expression? –  devnull Jun 7 '12 at 18:49
    
@algoh: Because the 16-bit quantity is 0000001000000011, or 2 << 8 + 3, or 2 * 2^8 + 3. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 7 '12 at 23:46
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