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When I try to compile this:

import java.util.*;

public class NameIndex
{
    private SortedMap<String,SortedSet<Integer>> table;

    public NameIndex()
    {
        this.table = new TreeMap<String,TreeSet<Integer>>();
    }
}

I get:

Incompatible types - found java.util.TreeMap<java.lang.String,java.util.TreeSet<java.lang.Integer>> but expected java.util.String,java.util.SortedSet<java.lang.Integer>>

Any idea why?

UPDATE: This compiles:

public class NameIndex
{
    private SortedMap<String,TreeSet<Integer>> table;

    public NameIndex()
    {
        this.table = new TreeMap<String,TreeSet<Integer>>();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
    
Yes - taking a look at this question I think I agree. My understanding is, from reading this question, that you can't have one generic as an interface and the other generic as a concrete class. They have to be the same. –  Snow Crash Jun 8 '12 at 8:07

3 Answers 3

Try this:

this.table = new TreeMap<String, SortedSet<Integer>>();

You can specify the actual type of the values in the map when you add elements to it, meanwhile you must use the same types used at the time of declaring the attribute (namely String and SortedSet<Integer>).

For example, this will work when adding new key/value pairs to the map:

table.put("key", new TreeSet<Integer>());
share|improve this answer

You can always declare:

private SortedMap<String, ? extends SortedSet<Integer>> table;

but I suggest using:

private Map<String, ? extends Set<Integer>> table; // or without '? extends'

Look at this question

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I would suggest ? extends SortedSet<Integer> since in the original notation in the question suggests the internal set is a TreeSet not just a set. –  Edwin Dalorzo Jun 7 '12 at 18:33
    
I believe that SortedSet and Set are both interfaces, therefore, by declaring ? extends SortedSet I think you wouldn't be compromising the principle of programming to interfaces and not to implementation. Plus, the contract for SortedSet is different from that from Set, and it has a few additional methods available in its public interface not available in the simple Set. –  Edwin Dalorzo Jun 7 '12 at 18:40
    
@edalorzo I agree with you completely. Providing SortedSet in declaration depends on how he will use this field later on. –  Xeon Jun 7 '12 at 18:45

Always type an object with the interface instead of the concrete type. So you should have:

private Map<String, Set<Integer>> table;

instead of what you have right now. The advantage is that you can switch out implementations whenever you want now.

Then:

this.table = new TreeMap<String, Set<Integer>>();

You get a compile-time error because SortedSet and TreeSet are different types, although they implement the same interface (Set).

share|improve this answer
    
SortedSet is an interface which is why I used it in the declaration of table. I then expected to use a concrete type (e.g. TreeSet) to implement. But that didn't compile. So, I had to specify a concrete type (i.e. TreeSet) both times. Which is what's confusing me. –  Snow Crash Jun 7 '12 at 18:37
    
The compile-time error caused the generics, not the outer types. TreeMap is a valid subtype (implementation) of SortedMap. –  CheeseWarlock Jun 7 '12 at 19:06
    
@CheeseWarlock You're right. I mixed up the Map and the Set. Fixing. –  Vivin Paliath Jun 7 '12 at 21:01

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