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Using the code found here: https://libbits.wordpress.com/2011/05/17/check-if-ip-is-within-range-specified-in-cidr-in-java/

  // Step 1. Convert IPs into ints (32 bits). 
// E.g. 157.166.224.26 becomes 10011101  10100110  11100000 00011010
int addr = (( 157 << 24 ) & 0xFF000000) 
           | (( 166 << 16 ) & 0xFF0000) 
           | (( 224 << 8 ) & 0xFF00) 
           |  ( 26 & 0xFF);

// Step 2. Get CIDR mask
int mask = (-1) << (32 - 10);

// Step 3. Find lowest IP address
int lowest = addr & mask;

// Step 4. Find highest IP address
int highest = lowest + (~mask);

I'm able to split a string into four ints and create boundaries for my IP range. Now I want to be able to generate an ip that is between the highest and lowest values. For example: given the range: 157.166.224.26/10 I get an address of -1650008038 my lowest ip address is -1652555776 and highest ip address is -1648361473. Now I need to generate a number that is between my lowest and highest and convert it back to four integers, this last part is where I'm lost at, I'm not sure how to convert -1648361473 to an ip address

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2  
Maybe before doing all that, you should read up on binary operators and memory models then. –  haylem Jun 7 '12 at 19:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That's pretty easy. Let say the IPv4 address is in the ipaddr variable, you can write something like that:

byte[] addr = new byte[4];
addr[0] = (ipaddr >> 24) & 0xFF;
addr[1] = (ipaddr >> 16) & 0xFF;
addr[2] = (ipaddr >> 8 ) & 0xFF;
addr[3] = ipaddr & 0xFF;

InetAddress inetAddr = InetAddress.getByAddress(addr);
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The answer that Teetoo made above deserves some explanation.

Lets start with the first value:

(ipaddr >> 24) & 0xFF

When this is shifted down, the 8 bits representing the 157 are in the rightmost position of the resulting integer. However, since the value was initially negative, you would have 1's in 24 most significant bits, which would end up giving you a negative number. What you want is to 0 out all but those last 8 bits, hence the "& 0xFF". Another way to do this would be to right shift using the >>> operator which forces 0's into the most significant bits.

(ipaddr >>> 24)

now we move on to:

(ipaddr >> 16) & 0xFF

When you shift, you'll have the 16 leftmost bits set to 1 (due to shifting a negative number). Then you'll have the 8 bits representing the 157 and then the 8 bits representing 166. In this case, the >>> operator wouldn't help us because we still have the 157 in there. So the "& 0xFF" will 0 out all but the 8 bits for the 166.

Similarly for the last two values.

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You can use

int addr = (157 << 24) | (166 << 16) | (224 << 8) | 26;

to reverse this.

byte[] addrAsBytes = { (byte) (addr >> 24), (byte) (addr >> 16), 
                (byte) (addr >> 8), (byte) addr };
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Is this a joke? Why would you shift a constant left 24 bytes then right 24 bytes? ;-) –  EJP Jun 8 '12 at 0:18
    
I think you mean 24 bits. ;) Hopefully this makes it clearer. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 8 '12 at 7:16

an addition to @Teetoo's answer.

let's ByteBuffer do the int to byte array magic

ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap (addr);
bb.putInt (iIP);
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overkill for simple bitshifting logic :) –  Matt Jun 7 '12 at 20:03
    
@Matt, lol, I like the simplicity. (1) it hide the byte order stuff (2) it show the C/C++ union {int, struct _addr{char,char,char,char} like usage when doing such conversion (3) code is cleaner –  LiuYan 刘研 Jun 8 '12 at 6:55

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