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As in the question, should my tests be as simple as possible or should they contain some logic that mimics the logic of the function i'm testing?
To give you an example, i'm testing this function:

$( 'ul.nav-tabs a' ).click( event_handlers.handle_set_tab_cookie );

var handle_set_tab_cookie = function( e ) {
    var active = $( this ).attr( 'href' );
    $.cookie( 'feeds_active_tab', active );
};

My test should be plain dumb like this:

describe( "Facebook Feeds page", function() {
    beforeEach( function() {
        $( 'ul.nav' ).remove();
        var html = $('<ul class="nav nav-tabs"><li class="active"><a data-toggle="tab" href="#facebook">Facebook Feeds</a></li><li class=""><a data-toggle="tab" href="#ics">ICS</a></li></ul>');
        $('body').append( html );
    } )
    it( "Should call jQuery cookie to save the href ", function() {
        // Set up the listeners
        page.start();
        // Set up spies
        spyOn($, 'cookie');
        // Start the test
        var a = $( 'a[href=#facebook]' );
        a.trigger( 'click' );
        // verify that it has been called with the correct parameter
        expect($.cookie).toHaveBeenCalled();
        expect($.cookie).toHaveBeenCalledWith('feeds_active_tab', '#facebook'); 
    } );
    afterEach( function() {
        $( 'ul.nav' ).remove();
    } );
} );

or have some iteration / logic so that i do all the tests at once?

describe( "Facebook Feeds page", function() {
    beforeEach( function() {
        $( 'ul.nav' ).remove();
        var html = $('<ul class="nav nav-tabs"><li class="active"><a data-toggle="tab" href="#facebook">Facebook Feeds</a></li><li class=""><a data-toggle="tab" href="#ics">ICS</a></li></ul>');
        $('body').append( html );
    } )
    it( "Should call jQuery cookie to save the href ", function() {
        // Set up the listeners
        page.start();
        // Set up spies
        spyOn($, 'cookie');
        // Start the test and iterate over all the links
        $( 'ul.nav a' ).each( function(i, el) {;
                $(el).trigger( 'click' );
                // verify that it has been called with the correct parameter
                expect($.cookie).toHaveBeenCalled();
                expect($.cookie).toHaveBeenCalledWith('feeds_active_tab', $(el).attr('href'); 
                    } ); 
    } );
    afterEach( function() {
        $( 'ul.nav' ).remove();
    } );
} );
share|improve this question
    
I will not downvote a 24K veteran - but this question will probably raise opinions ;) – madflow Jun 7 '12 at 19:21
    
This might belong more on programmers.stackexchange.com, as it is more of a conceptual question rather than an objective one. – Brisbe42 Jun 7 '12 at 19:24
    
@madflow if you don't agree you should downvote and explain why!I'm new to unit testing and i wanted to have a correct approach and so i asked help to more experienced users, i help on more practical tasks :) – Nicola Peluchetti Jun 7 '12 at 19:27
    
@Brisbe42 if more people feels that it's more appropriate for programmers i will move it, in any case flag it for attention – Nicola Peluchetti Jun 7 '12 at 19:28
    
@NicolaPeluchetti Fair enough :) – madflow Jun 7 '12 at 21:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

more complicated test:

  1. is harder to maintain
  2. can't be used as a documentation
  3. is harder to read and software is being read much often than it's written
  4. has higher probability to be written wrongly (who will test our tests?)
  5. may disrupt your api design during TDD

on the other hand it's easier and faster to write a single test that cover whole functionality then writing 12 small tests. that's why this way usually wins. to sum it up: if your project is planned to live long i would write smallest and simplest possible tests. it's more demanding but will profit in future

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the clear explanation. But what for DRY?Do i need to copy / paste and substitue "#facebook" with "#ics"?And then "#myspace", "#google+" etc etc etc?I know that if the test is wrong i might have problem, but if the test logic is right i might save time tomorrow if i implement things wrong when i add a new tab. – Nicola Peluchetti Jun 8 '12 at 0:59
    
you have to apply DRY also to your test code. would you copy-paste your production code? you have to refactor your tests, extract common procedures, fixtures etc. but i still believe each test should focus on a single functionality. i also don't buy the argument 'if the test code is right i'll save time'. this way you could say: 'if my production code is right i'll save time by not writing tests'. more time and money goes on maintenance, changes and bugfixes than on initial development so code should be maintainable and readable. tests are a part of your system, same rules apply to them – piotrek Jun 8 '12 at 10:05
    
A friend of mine on twitter told me "The first test is not actually "dumb" but I think covers the same code and execution path as the second" which is true i think maybe i don't need to test all possible clicks but only that the code works and for this the first test is enough – Nicola Peluchetti Jun 8 '12 at 10:13
1  
i agree. one more thing can be useful. of course one test per execution path is enough to check if code works. however if you think that after reading your test, someone will still wonder how the code (should) behave for other parameters (null, less than 0, empty string, different currency etc.) then it's good to add another test just as a documentation. of course if the execution path is the same, you should have no problem with extracting common test fixtures. does it violates DRY? not really. does it help to understand your code? significantly – piotrek Jun 8 '12 at 11:03

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