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I'm trying to use std::function in conjunction with std::bind, but I'm having some problems.

This works:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

void print() {
    std::cout << 2;
}

int main() {
    std::function<void ()> foo = print;
    (*foo.target<void (*)()>())(); //prints 3
}

This crashes at the second line of main:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

void print (int i) {
    std::cout << i;
}

int main() {
    std::function<void ()> foo = std::bind (print, 2);
    (*foo.target<void (*)()>())();
}

I'm really holding the std::function<void ()> and need to be able to return the function; not just call it. I expect the usage would be something like this:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

void print (int i) {
    std::cout << i;
}

int main() {
    Container c (std::bind (print, 2));

    //I would expect the original
    c.func() (3); //prints 3

    if (c.func() == print) /* this is what I'm mostly getting at */
}

Is there any way to get the original function to return it, or an alternative? It does kind of conflict with the return type as well, as void (*)() matches the bound signature quite nicely.

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This is just not possible: there is no function with a void() signature in your code. Had it been possible we wouldn't need std::function. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 7 '12 at 19:46
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes, it was a nice trick to store a generic function, but it seems only calling it works out. –  chris Jun 7 '12 at 19:48
    
@chris: Is the whole point of storing a generic function. Comparing generic functions becomes very tricky, and this is just the tip of the iceberg. –  Puppy Jun 7 '12 at 19:59
    
@DeadMG, Well, I'd best not get into it. It's not an overly important feature of my class, but it's nice to have. I can always keep a separate variable if I need to. –  chris Jun 7 '12 at 20:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is quite impossible. The whole reason that std::function exists is that function pointers suck horrifically and should never, ever, be used by anyone, ever again, except for the doomed souls bearing the Burning Standards of Hell C interoperation, because they cannot handle functions with state.

A std::function<void()> cannot, in the general case, be converted to a void(*)(). The only reason this works in the first example is because it happens to be a void(*)() originally.

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I guess I'll just have to forget about comparing it then, thank you. –  chris Jun 7 '12 at 19:52
6  
function pointers suck... only in the same way that int sucks, or raw pointers... they are the low level blocks on which higher level constructs are built. Without raw pointers and int you would not have std::string, without function pointers you would not have std::function... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 7 '12 at 20:12
    
@David: Not really. You can implement std::function without any knowledge of function pointers. –  Puppy Jun 8 '12 at 1:21
    
@DeadMG: Do you care to illustrate us? Oh, you mean with lambdas? If so, consider boost::bind and boost::function in a C++03 compiler, or any signals library (sigc++, boost::signals, Qt signals), or any user of Sun or HP compilers that don't have lambda support yet... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 8 '12 at 1:29
1  
@DavidRodriguez: Uh, why not just ... use a template like a sane person? –  Puppy Jun 8 '12 at 1:40

You can't get a function pointer out of an std::function, as there may not even be one. It could be a member function pointer instead, or an object that implements operator().

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This can be achieved using a little template meta-programming. I recently had use for this while writing a generic C++ wrapper around OpenGL GLUT (which depends on callback function pointers). The approach:

  1. Instantiate an instance of a singleton template type.
  2. Store your std::function as a member of to the singleton instance
  3. Invoke your std::function through a static member function (static member functions and free functions have the same type, so the "invoke" function can be used as a free function pointer)

Tested under C++11 on GCC 4.8.

#include <unistd.h>
#include <thread>
#include <chrono>
#include <mutex>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

template <const size_t _UniqueId, typename _Res, typename... _ArgTypes>
struct fun_ptr_helper
{
public:
    typedef std::function<_Res(_ArgTypes...)> function_type;

    static void bind(function_type&& f)
    { instance().fn_.swap(f); }

    static void bind(const function_type& f)
    { instance().fn_=f; }

    static _Res invoke(_ArgTypes... args)
    { return instance().fn_(args...); }

    typedef decltype(&fun_ptr_helper::invoke) pointer_type;
    static pointer_type ptr()
    { return &invoke; }

private:
    static fun_ptr_helper& instance()
    {
        static fun_ptr_helper inst_;
        return inst_;
    }

    fun_ptr_helper() {}

    function_type fn_;
};

template <const size_t _UniqueId, typename _Res, typename... _ArgTypes>
typename fun_ptr_helper<_UniqueId, _Res, _ArgTypes...>::pointer_type
get_fn_ptr(const std::function<_Res(_ArgTypes...)>& f)
{
    fun_ptr_helper<_UniqueId, _Res, _ArgTypes...>::bind(f);
    return fun_ptr_helper<_UniqueId, _Res, _ArgTypes...>::ptr();
}

template<typename T>
std::function<typename std::enable_if<std::is_function<T>::value, T>::type>
make_function(T *t)
{
    return {t};
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << (void*)get_fn_ptr<0>(make_function(::sin))<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}
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