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I'm designing a database to house scientific test data, using sqlalchemy. I've hit a problem that I can't seem to figure out.

In my test data, each Observation has a State (position, velocity, acceleration), and a State has an associated Time (time at which the state applies). So far, so good. I made a separate table for Times because I deal with different kinds of times, and I wanted to use a reference table to indicate what kind of time each time is (state time, observation time, etc). And the types of times I deal with might change, so normalizing in this way I think will let me add new kinds of times in the future, since they're just rows in a reference table.

So far this part works (using declarative style):

class Observation(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_observations'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    state_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_states.id'))
    state = relationship('State', uselist=False)

class State(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_states'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    time_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_times.id'))
    time = relationship('Time', uselist=False)

class Time(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_times'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    time_type_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('ref_tbl_time_types.id'))
    time_type = relationship('TimeType', uselist=False)
    time_value = Column(Float)

class TimeType(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'ref_tbl_time_types'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    desc = Column(String)

The wrinkle is that observations themselves can have different kinds of times. When I try to create a one-to-many relationship between Observation and Time, I get a circular dependency error:

class Observation(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_observations'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    state_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_states.id'))
    state = relationship('State', uselist=False)

    # Added this line:
    times = relationship('Time')

class Time(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_times'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    time_type_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('ref_tbl_time_types.id'))
    time_type = relationship('TimeType', uselist=False)
    time_value = Column(Float)

    # Added this line:
    observation_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_observations.id'))

I'm guessing this breaks because the original Observation -> State -> Time chain has a reference right back up to Observation.

Is there any way to fix this? Have I gotten my design all screwed up? Am I doing something wrong in sqlalchemy? I'm new to all of this so it could be any of the above. Any help you can give would be very much appreciated.

P.S. I tried doing what was recommended here: Trying to avoid a circular reference but either I did it wrong or it didn't solve my particular problem.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The other answers here regarding reconsideration of your use case are valuable, and you should consider those. However, as far as SQLAlchemy is concerned, the circular dependency issue due to multiple FKs is solved by the use_alter/post_update combination, documented at docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/rel_0_7/orm/relationships.html#rows-that-point-to-themselves-mutually-dependent-rows . Here is the model using that:

from sqlalchemy import *
from sqlalchemy.orm import *
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base

Base= declarative_base()

class Observation(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_observations'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    state_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_states.id'))
    state = relationship('State', uselist=False)

    times = relationship('Time')

class State(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_states'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    time_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_times.id'))

    # post_update is preferable on the many-to-one
    # only to reduce the number of UPDATE statements
    # versus it being on a one-to-many.
    # It can be on Observation.times just as easily.
    time = relationship('Time', post_update=True)

class Time(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_times'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    time_type_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('ref_tbl_time_types.id'))
    time_type = relationship('TimeType', uselist=False)
    time_value = Column(Float)

    observation_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_observations.id', 
                                    use_alter=True, name="fk_time_obs_id"))

class TimeType(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'ref_tbl_time_types'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    desc = Column(String)


e = create_engine("postgresql://scott:tiger@localhost/test", echo=True)
Base.metadata.drop_all(e)
Base.metadata.create_all(e)

s = Session(e)

tt1 = TimeType(desc="some time type")
t1, t2, t3, t4, t5 = Time(time_type=tt1, time_value=40), \
                Time(time_type=tt1, time_value=50), \
                Time(time_type=tt1, time_value=60),\
                Time(time_type=tt1, time_value=70),\
                Time(time_type=tt1, time_value=80)

s.add_all([
    Observation(state=State(time=t1), times=[t1, t2]),
    Observation(state=State(time=t2), times=[t1, t3, t4]),
    Observation(state=State(time=t2), times=[t2, t3, t4, t5]),
])

s.commit()
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This is awesome. Where else can you go and get a detailed, personalized answer to a question about a software package from the creator of that software? Thanks Mike! –  IanVS Jun 15 '12 at 13:56
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You have a many to one relationship between Observations and States. So one State can have many Observations, and every Observation has one State.

You also have a many to one relationship between States and Times. So one Time can have many States, and every State has one Time.

You are correct in that the problem is the reference back to observations from Times. You are forcing each Time to have an Observation, which in turn has to have a State, which in turn has to have a Time (and then the loop repeats forever).

To break this you need to figure out what you are actually trying to portray in these relationships. If an Observation has a State, which has a Time, then the Observation has a Time (you can get the Time from the State).

So the real question you need to answer is: What does it mean to say that a Time has an Observation? how would you be using that in your application?

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Thanks. What I intended to have is a one-to-one between Observations and States, and between States and Times. If I coded that wrong, please help me out. I thought the uselist=True was how I make it one-to-one. I want a one-to-many between Observations and Times, meaning an Observation has many different kinds of times. –  IanVS Jun 7 '12 at 20:42
    
@IanVS - here is a link to relationships in sqlalchemy docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/rel_0_7/orm/relationships.html I have not used it myself, so I am not sure exactly how it all works, but this is a pretty good guide for how to set up the different kinds of relationships. –  Caleb Jun 8 '12 at 5:30
    
@IanVS - That being said, I think you will still have a problem making relationships in the way you describe. You are still creating a circle by making the Observations connect to Times in two different ways. You either need to not make States depend on Times, or not make Observations depend on Times, or not make Observations depend on States. I don't know what these objects actually mean in your application, so I don't know how they relate. But I don't understand how a object can be related to something with one "Time" but also have many "Times" of it's own. –  Caleb Jun 8 '12 at 5:35
    
Thanks again. Perhaps one way to deal with this is to split the Times table into two? One for ObservationTimes and one for StateTimes. I'll try that. For now I'll leave the question as unanswered in case anyone has a way I can keep the tables together. –  IanVS Jun 8 '12 at 14:22
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I guess I do not completely get the model names in your object model and how they correspond to the real world. But I will try to guess. First, I doubt that the model Time (which looks to be rather basic and almost logic-free) should have a ForeignKey to some higher-level model class Observation. In light of this, I see your model not as a chain of n-1 relationships, but rather a kind of ternary relationship. So I could see you model like following:

class Base(object):
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

class Observation(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_observations'

class ObservationInstance(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_observation_instances'
    observation_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_observations.id'))
    state_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_states.id'))
    time_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('tbl_times.id'))

    # relationships
    observation = relationship('Observation', backref="instances")
    state = relationship('State')
    time = relationship('Time')

class State(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_states'

class Time(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'tbl_times'
    time_type_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('ref_tbl_time_types.id'))
    time_type = relationship('TimeType', uselist=False)
    time_value = Column(Float)

class TimeType(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'ref_tbl_time_types'
    desc = Column(String)

Hope this makes any sense, and fits the real world you are trying to model. I assumed that you model represents some kind of (scientific) experiment. In this case I would rename Observation -> Experiement and ObservationInstance -> Observation.

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Thanks for your help. I guess what I don't see (and maybe I'm missing it), is how I can have an ObservationInstance related to a time (call it an observation time) and its state related to a different time (a state time). I've simplified my example, but in reality I might have an number of "predicted" states, with times in the future. So an observation will have one observation time, and multiple states each with their own state times. Does your design above support this? –  IanVS Jun 11 '12 at 15:36
    
@IanVS: I agree with van that the problems in your model appear to show through in the naming. A time is not a state, nor does it have a state; a state is what is the case, not when it is the case, so it doesn't have a time. Why don't you have entities Time and State related by an Occurrence that links to both? –  reinierpost Jun 11 '12 at 15:41
    
@reinierpost: A state is worthless without an associated time at which the state is valid, so why would you say that a state does not have a time? Perhaps that is unclear from my description. A state in my case is a position, velocity, and acceleration at a particular time. Thinking of it that way, perhaps it makes more sense to add a 'valid_time' column to state and have the time table only relate to observation. –  IanVS Jun 11 '12 at 20:50
1  
@IanVS: I believe you are using the term 'state' incorrectly. A state is what is the case (in your case: a position, velocity, and acceleration), not when it is the case. Models become easier to understand if they use words in a way that is as close as possible to their everyday meaning(s). I believe your 'circular' reference arises for the same reason that you are including a moment in time when describing what a state is. –  reinierpost Jun 13 '12 at 11:19
    
@reinierpost: I believe we are approaching the term from different angles. I'm using the word as a shortcut for "state vector", which in my field is defined as a three dimensional pos, vel, acc at a particular validity time. I apologize that this term caused confusion, and thanks again for your help. –  IanVS Jun 14 '12 at 17:30
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